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Moisture issue


gtblum
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Hi,

Did a raised ranch with a moisture problem that I can't pin point.

The worst part is dead center of the building in the lower living space. The carpet in this area has been cut out and there is a dehumidifier running 24/7.

There is no sign of staining, repair, or replacement of any of the perimeter walls. (original rock,paneling,and trim) Is it possible that it's ground water that is permeating through the pad? If so, what do you do about it?

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Hi,

Yeah, it could be but there's no way, within the context of a home inspection, that you can determine that.

It's possible that the footing drain is full of fines, isn't taking any water, and is allowing water to accumulate under/around that foundation. A drainage guy needs to try and figure that out. If he determines that it's occluded footing drains, and there's no way to flush them (usually isn't), he has a few choices - dig 'em up outside and replace them, break out the floor inside and install a perimeter drainage system and replace the floor, install a sump pump or a combination of the second and third options.

If you can get the owner to agree to it and your client to pay for it, you could roll back the carpet and tape a piece of clear polyethylene about 3ft. square to the slab, wait 24 hours and then come back and check it. If a whole lot of moisture accumulates on the backside of the plastic, you'll know that water is surfacing between the underside of the slab and the vapor barrier beneath the slab and is being carried up through the slab by capillary action. Of course, unless you personally sit there and babysit it for that 24 hours, you'll have no way to know whether the homeowner peeled off the plastic, dried it, and then reinstalled it just before you arrived.

If you're convinced that there is an excess moisture issue, punt it to a drainage specialist for diagnosis and correction.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Originally posted by Mike Lamb

How about a bad waste pipe beneath the slab?

Hi,

I guess I wouldn't rule it out if the type of waste lines used there are often problematic. I suppose that having a pipe scoping guy look at the main waste line first would be prudent. One of the big drainage specialists here has its own scoping equipment.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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