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Golf Ball Holes and Indentions in Hardiplank


McMichael
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I wouldn't presume to speak for Hardie, but certainly the piece with the hole should be replaced -- don't try to patch it if you want a "permanent" repair. As for the indentations, I would think that the important thing to know is that the siding is made in layers. If the integrity of the outer one has been damaged enough, I suspect you'd be subject to more moisture absorption. This would lead to premature failure.

IF the dents are large enough that the "skin" is broken at the perimeter of the dent, I'd suggest replacing those pieces also, although a good, flexible caulk might be skimmed over the area to provide a decent repair.

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Living on a golf course, about 4 indentions and one hold in hardiplank. Wrote to Hardie twice to their technical department, and no one has replies. Would like to know how to repair before repainting our home. Everything else about the product has been great.

Auto body filler, such as Bondo, works great.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Not to be all smartypantsy, but people who live on golf courses are going to get dents in their siding (especially EIFS) along with some broken windows. Comes with the territory. One might want to consider plexiglass.

Also, strangers will retrieve their golf balls from your yard.

Hardie (and everybody else) will disclaim damage from projectiles. Damage is/was foreseeable.

Used to do lots of inspections around local golf courses,

WJ

Boy, has he got that right! I nailed somebody's out building a couple hours ago. Good thing it was there. That could have been an expensive shot.

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I wouldn't presume to speak for Hardie, but certainly the piece with the hole should be replaced -- don't try to patch it if you want a "permanent" repair. As for the indentations, I would think that the important thing to know is that the siding is made in layers. If the integrity of the outer one has been damaged enough, I suspect you'd be subject to more moisture absorption. This would lead to premature failure.

IF the dents are large enough that the "skin" is broken at the perimeter of the dent, I'd suggest replacing those pieces also, although a good, flexible caulk might be skimmed over the area to provide a decent repair.

But imagine how difficult it would be to coax out one damaged board, and then remove the nails that were holding it in place so you could slide in and face-nail the replacement. I've installed Hardie stuff and what I just described would pretty much be impossible without damaging the board above the bad one.

If insurance is paying for the repair, I say remove as many courses as necessary and replace. If it's on me, I'd try Bondo like Jim said.

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But imagine how difficult it would be to coax out one damaged board, and then remove the nails that were holding it in place so you could slide in and face-nail the replacement. I've installed Hardie stuff and what I just described would pretty much be impossible without damaging the board above the bad one.

I bust in w/a hammer, take out the piece 16 inches at time and then remove the nails with long handle Snap-On diagonals. Easier than patching.

Of course the replacement gets face nailed w/ stainless ring shanked 8D siding nails.

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But imagine how difficult it would be to coax out one damaged board, and then remove the nails that were holding it in place so you could slide in and face-nail the replacement. I've installed Hardie stuff and what I just described would pretty much be impossible without damaging the board above the bad one.

I bust in w/a hammer, take out the piece 16 inches at time and then remove the nails with long handle Snap-On diagonals. Easier than patching.

Of course the replacement gets face nailed w/ stainless ring shanked 8D siding nails.

You, of course, have skills I can only dream about.

The diagonal cutters are 1/2" thick or so. How do you lift up the board above the damaged one without the upper board cracking around the nail holes?

And don't say, "Carefully . . . . "

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Gary, it was my understanding that people who live on golf courses are responsible for damage to their house if golf balls hit it. Supposed to carry insurance to cover it. Known hazard, etc. Perhaps I'm mis-informed??

That may be Erby. I honestly don't know. I let my conscience be my guide. If I wreck your stuff, I'll pay for my errant shot.

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The diagonal cutters are 1/2" thick or so. How do you lift up the board above the damaged one without the upper board cracking around the nail holes?

Actually they're about 5/16 of an inch thick and the blind nails are only an inch or so away. I misspoke: I don't remove the nails, I cut them flush. The siding easily tips out 1/4 inch w/o damage to give some wiggle room when the new piece is slipped in

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