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What is the fix for this?


barlyhop
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This house was recently resided and tuckpointed. The homeowner decided to use spray foam insulation all over instead of caulk. This stuff was protruding everywhere, between masonry and vinyl siding, out from under the siding at lower edge, window frames and you name it.

What would be the recommended repair?

I just recommended trimming, scraping it out a bit and caulking over it.

Kind of puzzled on this one.

Thanks

Randy

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Other than a cosmetic eyesore, I'm not sure there is anything to repair as far as the spray foam is concerned. On the other hand, stuff like this makes you wonder how everything else is put together.

Is that stone veneer installed over top of vinyl siding? It at least looks like it's stuck on over the vinyl corner trim. That can't be right. See what I mean by everything else?

Time to get crafty with the comments on this one. I wouldn't want to stab at it since I didn't see the whole thing.

What year is the construction and do you have any wide angle shots?

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Protecting the Foam: Cured foam can be trimmed, shaped, sanded, painted or stained. The foam will discolor if exposed to ultraviolet light. Paint or coat foam for best results in outdoor applications. my bold

Geat Stuff doesn't go so far as to say the foam actually requires paint or coating, but it does seem like a "best practice".

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Very good questions! I don't have any other photo's. The home was built in 1924, the stone veneer looks original with new pointing. No idea what the original siding was.

I suspect that the original siding was removed to install insulation. Cannot figure out why the vinyl siding is flush with the end of the stone otherwise?

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That house looks weird. LIke it was chopped of on the left side.

With a 1924 house, it probably had no insulation in the exterior walls on the original build. That's where the spray foam came as an attempt to fill the wall cavities.

Did the house have a basement or crawl? Could you see up the wall cavities from below (ballon framing)?

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Very good questions! I don't have any other photo's. The home was built in 1924, the stone veneer looks original with new pointing. No idea what the original siding was.

I suspect that the original siding was removed to install insulation. Cannot figure out why the vinyl siding is flush with the end of the stone otherwise?

The stone is *not* original to that house. Heck, the whole front of that house is not original, it's a hamfisted addition.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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I had a bad feel when I saw the first photo. When I saw the whole house, I know why I had a bad feel.

The place was hacked together.

Spray foam coming out of the seams is the stamp of the devil. I'd be real concerned with the waterproof detailing under the stone and vinyl, and just about everything else.

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Indeed, I had the same concerns!

The house had a full basement, all of the box sills were filled with spray foam insulation so no I could not see up into the wall.

The 13 year old garage sheathed in OSB was rotting along the lower edge of the walls, it's bottom edge was exposed behind the vinyl siding. The new concrete front porch was poured over old porch and finished even with the threshold with no step up whatsoever.

The front facade stone was full thickness, not a thin veneer so I was unsure of it's origin, the pointing was all done recently and kind of sloppy. The grade was improved around the entire house, up over stone in front of home so I did not verify presence of weeps.

Most of the improvements to the home were done well such as all new copper plumbing, new electrical panel and wiring, etc.

I just had to scratch my head when I observed the exterior finishes, not knowing what is beneath them.

Thanks alot everyone!

Randy

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  • 2 weeks later...

"so I did not verify presence of weeps." Without having been there, I would say that I'm concerned that some person has now sealed all the air venting that will be needed to allow moisture to dry out behind the stone. Any water gets in, it has to dry out or will cause rot. Assuming a good mason installed the stone, he left the ends gapped on purpose. Plugging them is not a good idea.

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