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Old and New Drinking Fountain Refrigerant


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Referencing old and new water drinking fountains

I have heard a recommendation to change the refrigerant every 2 years. Is there any truth to this and/or what is the reason?

Thank you all for your help[:-thumbu]

I have read on cars that some people recommend replacing the dryer after 2 years because of humidity gain through hoses and such and the dryer is full. This appears to require evacuation? Could this be it?

What do you think?

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Referencing old and new water drinking fountains

I have heard a recommendation to change the refrigerant every 2 years. Is there any truth to this and/or what is the reason?

About the same amount of truth that recommends changing the air in your tires every two years. Nuff said.

I have read on cars that some people recommend replacing the dryer after 2 years because of humidity gain through hoses and such and the dryer is full. This appears to require evacuation? Could this be it?

What do you think?

I'm not sure where you're hearing this stuff but I'd find another source.

There is absolutely no truth to these statements. If you stop and think about it how is humidity going to penetrate a refrigerant line that doesn't let refrigerant escape and is under pressure? Moisture can enter the system by sloppy service methods or when a system is out of gas, no low pressure control, and is running in a vacuum.

Do you have people at work pulling your leg?

I remember when I was a kid, 16-17, and just got a job at an auto parts store selling. One of the old time mechanics came in and asked for a set of muffler bearings for a 61 Rambler (or something akin to it). They all had a good laugh as I was pouring over the books trying to find it.

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No. No sky hooks. I am actually 43 myself. Don't kill me for it but electrical was actually my specialty for 12 years before inspection.

It was in a prior inspection report on water coolers.

Do you know if refrigeration maintenance compliance plans (which may require inspection every 2 years) extends to these units? I would think that it would extend to these.

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It was in a prior inspection report on water coolers.

Did someone actually recommend replacement of the refrigerant as part of a "maintenance plan"? That's funny.

Refrigerant does not grow weak with age (unlike me). There is absolutely no need to replace it every two years (unless you're trying to drum up business based on false information).

Do you know if refrigeration maintenance compliance plans (which may require inspection every 2 years) extends to these units? I would think that it would extend to these.

Define refrigerant maintenance compliance plan.

A sound preventative maintenance plan will extend the life of refrigeration equipment and help prevent costly breakdowns.

A maintenance plan for a water cooler however would consist of cleaning the condenser every year (depending on atmosphere) and drinking the water to make sure it is chilled. That's about it. Even if you ignored it most likely it would last long enough to make replacement cheaper than spending labor dollars to PM it.

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I have no idea whether or not a water cooler would be part of a compliance plan without reading a source/reference document. There is no way to check refrigerant pressures as these small chillers don't have any access valves - much like your refrigerator at home - so there is no way to start a baseline in which to reference. Besides that, just the process of removing a set of gauges from a drinking fountain would most likely make it short on gas (very little refrigerant to start with).

Are you creating this plan from scratch?

You can always email me at hlisATwindstream.net if you need a quick answer to something or to discuss further.

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One thing with LEED (I am LEED certified by the way) is a real bother to me... It is so basically contrary to root of being green.

According to LEED, grass is bad. It uses too much water. A company would be better off with a long lasting environmentally friendly non-VOC astroturf than grass - according to LEED.

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