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Originally posted by hausdok

This is posted on behalf of our computer challenged Brian G., who's yet to figure out how to post photos.

Objection your honor! I'm like a man who gets a bad case E.D. late in life: I know how to do it, the damned thing just won't work. [:-crazy]

It's gotta be my computer, 'cause I can't post a photo on any of the forums.

Sorry about horning in on your thread Bill, it was meant be a new topic.

Brian G.

P.P.D. Sufferer (Photo Posting Disfunction) [:-grumpy]

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Originally posted by hausdok

Save to file as JPEG. Rename without any spaces or symbols. Click upload file, browse to it, click it, upload it and your done.

I do all of that, it says it has it, but when I click on the link in the post I always get the "Page not available" page. Same at ASHI, IN, etc.

Enough wit da drift already, let's talk about the houses. [:-magnify

Brian G.

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hausdok,

My report about the drain would state something to the effect, "The top vented s-trap is no longing in use today. Updating the drain to a p-trap would be recommended." Although, telling the client, "It ain't right, have a plumber fix it." Would also get the point across without swamping the client with HI speak.

Kevin Teitel

house-Pro Inspections

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The "porch within a porch" is the portico, although this one oddly proportioned. Porticos are usually a smaller radiused roof assembly within the larger porch.

I forget where I gleaned this tidbit, but it was authoritative and I tucked it away. "Portico" (the term) is mis-used in almost all cases; it is not just a covered walkway leading to an entrance.

I'm kinda thinkin' "Rich Redneck", w/overtones of Victorian w/some frame Georgian mixed in.

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"Rednecktorgian" We have a several of these throughout Mississippi and I am sure other parts of the South. Most were built after the War of Northern Aggression.

Most will have a porch that wraps around one side or the entire structure. You had to have a place to sit in your rocker and sip those Mint Juleps!

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Hmmm...portico.

From my Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture:

"portico - A range of columns or arches in front of a building, often merged into the facade, including a covered walkway of which one or more sides are open. It includes every kind of covered ambulatory."

An "ambulatory" is apparently any defined walkway or passageway.

My first thought was to call it a "gallery", because I've heard that term applied to similar features on other houses around here. The book disagrees with that too.

Brian G.

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Originally posted by Brian G.

Hmmm...portico.

From my Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture:

"portico - A range of columns or arches in front of a building, often merged into the facade, including a covered walkway of which one or more sides are open. It includes every kind of covered ambulatory."

An "ambulatory" is apparently any defined walkway or passageway.

My first thought was to call it a "gallery", because I've heard that term applied to similar features on other houses around here. The book disagrees with that too.

Brian G.

Yeah, I got that too. My previous statement is based on some article/book on historic homes I read a few years back where it went into the definition of "portico" at length; the article was insistent that the term is nearly always misused, & that most dictionary definitions were also incorrect.

If someone comes up w/a definitive, OK. I'm not sure Brian's dictionary is correct, though.

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Originally posted by kurt

If someone comes up w/a definitive, OK. I'm not sure Brian's dictionary is correct, though.

Not so long ago, in a galaxy very, very near you....

Portico Wars!id="size5">

Say Kurt, maybe this is a hotly debated item in the strange and whacky world of architecture. Maybe your source or mine is a wild-eyed radical out to change everyone's thinking on portico's forever. [:-mohawk][:D][:-dev3]

Brian G.

Use the Force Kurt! [:-alien]

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A series of columns placed at regular intervals is called a colonnade. During the 19th century in America, a series of columns placed at regular intervals that supports a roof over the main entry on the FACADE of a building was called a portico. The roofs are usually flat (except during the Greek revival period) and are usually square, rectangular or semicircular. Everything else was typically called a porch. The word gallery is typically used when referring to an exterior covered corridor that is open at the sides.

Now Southerners may use these terms differently. The 2-story porch, so common on facades in the South, is usually at the side of a rear ell here.

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Originally posted by inspecthistoric

During the 19th century in America, a series of columns placed at regular intervals that supports a roof over the main entry on the FACADE of a building was called a portico. The roofs are usually flat (except during the Greek revival period) and are usually square, rectangular or semicircular.

That sounds like a very good description of the larger structure that covers the front of this house, but I figure there's probably a proper name (or two) for that smaller, upper "porch" underneath the main roof. Any thoughts on that Bill?

Brian G.

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In the report I already called it simply "the small 2nd floor front porch", I'm just trying to learn if there is a specific, proper name for that type. Education man, education. [:-graduat [:-glasses

I wish the builder had stopped 3 or 4 feet shorter at each end on that porch. It was raining off and on while I was there, and when I walked out on that porch water had blown in at one end. The decking was 1 x 4 tongue & groove, the railing was solid panels right down to the decking, and the water really had nowhere to go.

It has a big package unit taking care of the first floor. When I checked out the model number today it turned out to be between 29 - 33 years old. It must have been repainted at some point, it didn't look that old. Still chuggin' along.

Brian G.

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Originally posted by inspecthistoric

Anything that is an extension off the second (or third) floor of a house, I call a balcony.

That's two for balcony, so I guess I'll go with that next time. I appreciate your indulgence gentlemen, maybe I've been looking at this architectural dictionary too hard. Architecture is a very old discipline with many layers. It seems like there's a special name for every little thing and a compound name for every variation of every little thing. Beyond the scope I know, but interesting.

Brian G.

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Originally posted by Brian G.

Originally posted by inspecthistoric

Anything that is an extension off the second (or third) floor of a house, I call a balcony.

That's two for balcony, so I guess I'll go with that next time. I appreciate your indulgence gentlemen, maybe I've been looking at this architectural dictionary too hard. Architecture is a very old discipline with many layers. It seems like there's a special name for every little thing and a compound name for every variation of every little thing. Beyond the scope I know, but interesting.

Brian G.

Put me down for balcony too.

In general, I try not to get too hung up on the fancy architectural terms. If it's not at the tip of my tongue, chances are my customers won't understand the term.

Balcony is easy. Everyone understands that. If I were to start throwing around portico, loggia, entablature, modillion, etc. it would just confuse people.

The one exception is the word, "escutcheon." I just love saying that word.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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