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Hardwired range w/ appliance cord.


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This is the kitchen range wiring. It looks like someone cut the plug off and hardwired the cord. Is this allowed?

My guess is no, since the cord/ plug was a listed component. I just can't recall seeing this exact installation before, and figured I'd better ask.

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If memory serves, a range can be hardwired if proper wiring is used, the wiring is properly secured/ connected to the junction box, and if there's a lock out.

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If memory serves, a range can be hardwired if proper wiring is used, the wiring is properly secured/ connected to the junction box, and if there's a lock out.

Maybe, but wouldn't that still be ABNORMAL in a regular kitchen? Just tell them to fix it with a properly wired receptacle and a new cord-set. Who is going to argue with that?

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Also, the receptacle/plug serves as a local disconnect. That's needed too.

Marc

The local disconnect can be omitted if there's a lockout at the breaker. It's a consideration, but it wouldn't prohibit hardwiring the range.

Hardwiring seems to be the rule with wall ovens, drop-in ranges, and cooktops.

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  • 1 month later...

I disagree. Art. 400.7; Uses Permitted, (A)(3) connection of portable luminaires, portable and mobile signs, or appliances. (6) Connection of utilization of equipment to facilitate frequent interchange. (8) Appliances where the fastening means and mechanical connections are..... etc. Pretty sure these are "permanent wiring". However, uses not permitted (1) as a substitute for the fixed wiring of a structure. i.e. branch, feeder circuits etc. Additionally, I must agree that cutting off the cord cap of said cord more than likely violates it's UL listing and is not a viable wiring method. Can't imagine why someone would want to "hardwire" a domestic range appliance--one should be able to easily pull that sucka out once in a while and clean the spilled chicken noodle soup underneath it. :-)

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How could anyone possibly argue that this is an OK install?

Where does it say anywhere in any code that it's OK to pinch a power cord between a box and a cover?

It's a simple choice; either hard wire it with the proper materials or put a plug on the end of that cord and install a receptacle so that it can be plugged/unplugged.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Flexible cord cannot take the place of perm. wiring, as soon as the attachment plug is cut off & wired in, it becomes perm. wiring.

Think perhaps I may have eluded to the fact that is install was ok. Ohhhh, it's not. I was simply with the above wording "perm wiring". Flexible cord is "permanent". Anywho.... I'm not a home inspector- I couldn't hold a candle to any of the fine folks on here in that regard. I do enjoy reading this site and actually learn a few things time to time. I rarely chime in, especially on post, answered long ago and are dead in the water - so to speak. And when I do chime in, it's purpose is to help, not to insult or throw anyone under the bus. Finally, thanks to all on here for a very informative site, Mr. Katen, Mr. Moore and others you seem like a very knowledgeable about electricity, I'm very impressed. Marc from Lafayette, you are an interesting fella. I mean that kindly. Again, thanks to all on here; I truly enjoy this site.

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