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Foreboding feeling


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Have you ever had a forebodig feeling about something and it just drove you nuts thinking about it?

For the last month or so I've had this feeling that I'd leave the water running in a sink or tub.

I can't seem to shake this silly feeling. It was so bad the other day I checked the same dang bathroom 4 times to make sure I had turned the water off!

Last week I was inspecting the upstairs bathroom and couldn't remember if I'd turned the downstairs tub off. I shot downstairs to find that I had turned it off and that it had already drained.

The last time I left one running was around the first of the year. I'd turned on the Utility Room sink and forgot about it as my helper had called me to come look at a water stain at a window. About 10 minutes later I hear him holler "Oh s**t there's water all over the Utility Room floor" (the home was vacant and the Buyer was not present thank goodness)

It cleaned up pretty easy. However this is one of my worst fears when inspecting. The thought has crossed my mind that it might be my time to forget and leave another sink running again.

Just curious if anyone has these feelings when inspecting.

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i think its oldtimers disease. I get the same feeling about gas ovens. Have gone back to the property more than once and found I had turned them off. I now leave my truck keys on top of the stove and retreive them when I turn the oven off.

Another good idea is to make it part of your routine to check the water meter before leaving the property.

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I have driven miles back to job because of wondering if I left something on like maybe the furnace on 90 degrees. Once I crawled into the lowest, wettest, muddy crawl space to check furnace. Turned off the service switch checked the air handler and crawled out and left the service switch Off. That night got a call from owner wanting to know what I did to his furnace. I knew right away what I did, returned crawled back into wet, muddy, low crawl on my belly and turned the switch on. The owner was happy and I felt like a double first class jerk. Cursed myself all the way home. I can not repeat what I called myself I might get kicked of forum. [:-dunce][:-crazy]

Paul Burrell

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I've never left a door unlocked, but I bet I've driven 50 times back to check if I left one unlocked. For me it's not so much a foreboding feeling, more like a panic attack. Even when I am almost certain I locked it, and I try to convince myself it's locked, tell myself I've never left one unlocked, I still have to go back and check. Finally realized that the reason this was happening was because I had something pressing on my mind during that time. It was my mind not focused, wandering. So now, I take 5 minutes ( I time it) before I leave to re-focus on things I might have left un-done. Has helped me a bunch.

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I do the keys on the range trick, and I also go through all of my list of things I shut off,locked, etc, with the agent, seller, or buyer-whoever is on site. This serves two purposes:

1. I remember to do everything i have to do.

2. I minimize any screw ups by the agent, seller, buyer, that get blamed on the inspector!

I also do the 10 degree trick (I think I learned it from one of the guys on this site) Always raise or lower the thermostat 10 degrees to check it. That way you never have to remember the temp!

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Yes, The damn oven.....I always check it twice. Finally I just remember to turn it on first (as soon as I check that I'm not going to burn any combustionables in it), then the burners on the cooktop, then check to see that it's getting to temperature, and shut it off.....

But then another nemesis takes it's place......with going back over the damn Safety/Tempered Markings on the Sliding Glass doors, The upstairs, downstairs, bathrooms.....I go over the entire house again, because I think there may be one I forgot....but there is'ent. Probably next year, it will be...the damn t-stats!!!! Don't feel alone!!!

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Uh uh,

Not to hijack this thread's topic, but I'd never be worried about an oven being left on, because I'd never inspect/test an oven like that, unless my state required me to (ie. TREC's silly appliance rules - phooey!).

It takes me about ten seconds to confirm that all burners on the range come on and all elements in the oven are heating and then I turn it off. A little longer for a gas oven. Then I check to see if there's an anti-tip bracket on it, look at/test any 240volt receptacle to it or examine the gas piping configuration, make sure clearances above it are safe and I move on.

I tell folks before I begin that neither ASHI nor NAHI's standards of practice require me to inspect/test appliances, so all I'll be doing is a simple on/off check of the appliances to determine whether they are even functional - that's it.

I reinforce that statement by telling them that, as far as I'm concerned, I'm not concerned about "how" functional it is. I state very clearly that I won't be putting any food down the disposal to see how well it grinds; I don't have any cake batter in a pan to determine whether the oven is going to reach and maintain a certain temperature over a certain period of time; I don't have a bag full of trash to stuff in the trash compactor; I'm not going to be measuring the strength of the radiation in the microwave; I don't have any my own dirty dishes to run through the dishwasher and I won't run it if the owner has left dishes in it; and I don't have any dirty clothes to wash and dry in the laundry.

Then I tell 'em, "Simply put, I'm here to inspect the structure, it's surroundings and it's electro-mechanicals but this inspection does not provide you any guaranty concerning the condition or functionality of household appliance beyond the time it takes me to walk to my vehicle, get in and drive away.

9-1/2 years and counting and nobody has ever complained about the way I deal with appliances and I've never had a single former client call me to complain about an appliance that didn't work.

I know it sounds severe as I explain it in writing, but I say it with a smile and a twinkle in my eye and folks always "get it".

There're a kajillion things we are required to inspect by the standards of care of this profession that are a whole lot more important than appliances. I just don't understand why anyone would want to dork around with them.

Might be just me. I do have a reputation as a curmudgeon to uphold.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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There're a kajillion things we are required to inspect by the standards of care of this profession that are a whole lot more important than appliances. I just don't understand why anyone would want to dork around with them.

Might be just me. I do have a reputation as a curmudgeon to uphold.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Same here appliances on off and move on. I do not inspect trash compactors. I tell the buyer they are unsanitary and breed germs and If it were mine I would remove it from the home. I do not fill a hot tub just to watch it blow bubbles. I run the motor 3 seconds and check the GFCI tub safety switch for proper operation.

ASHI does not require checking hot tubs the last time I looked at requirements.

Paul Burrell

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The founders in their wisdom grouped water heaters and air conditioner compressors in plumbing and hvac categories. Washing machines, stoves, microwaves, dishwashers, disposals, are all accessories and were grouped as part of the interior.

Buyers/Sellers hire me, and you, to find the big stuff. The stuff that is very significant and costly to fix - Bad roofs, damaged foundations, settling foundations, inadequate structural, poor exterior installation practices that will promote water infiltration and rot, other major stuff that they don't know how to spot. I note when they don't come on, but I'm not going any further than that, 'cuz there's a whole lot of other stuff that's a lot more important than a $300 optional item that isn't germain to the actual function of the structure.

There's no need to split hairs any finer than that. If you get a warm and fuzzy using valuable time to fuss around with used appliances, by all means go for it.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Paul,

Are you talking about whirlpool bathtubs?

If you don't fill them, how do you know the drain, pump or pipes don't leak.

I fill well about the jets and run for about 5 minutes. If it's new construction, I fill above the overflow to check that for leaks.

I find many many problems with whirlpools; leaks, pumps not properly supported, no access etc.

Darren

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Checking whirlpool tubs can be a good thing. 1. is there enough hot water? when filling it use just hot water. 2.Check the time it takes to fill(flow and pressure).3. Turn tub on for a few seconds.4.Watch and listen when draining the tub.

As a general rule I always fill the tubs with enough water. When you shut them off-check for faucet leaks(drips) and shower head leaks. Fill lavatories-same reasons. Check for leaks and ability to hold water.Do a red dye test in the toilets tanks-(check for running/leak-by). Around here, water is expensive.

When you exercise the plumbing system, it is possible to find pressure/flow problems and drainage problems and leaky pipe connections etc.

Eyeball the water service line, the water tank,and the waste lines for any leaking evidence[:-banghea

Jack Ahern Needham on the Charles

Bridgton,Maine

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I run all apliances, and report that they were checked for basic function (doesn't leak, make funny noises, trip breakers, and such), not for efficiency.

I do a lot of things that aren't "required", but that's just me.

Go ahead an miss a bad appliance and see how long it takes to get the dreaded "phone call"!

It doesn't take much time to run them anyway.

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Originally posted by Darren

Paul,

Are you talking about whirlpool bathtubs?

If you don't fill them, how do you know the drain, pump or pipes don't leak.

I fill well about the jets and run for about 5 minutes. If it's new construction, I fill above the overflow to check that for leaks.

I find many many problems with whirlpools; leaks, pumps not properly supported, no access etc.

Darren

Yes. I run water, check for drainage, leaks, pump operation and GFCI ground protection. I have seen wall switches installed on a tub wall [:-dunce]. I always inform client and seller if present that circulating whirl pools, hot tubs, jacuzzi's work like a swimming pool and have to be cleaned according to manufactures specs. Because if not cleaned properly on a regular basis they will develop e coli bacteria. Hope I spelled that correct. Personally I have no use for them. I have not taken a bath in years.

Paul Burrell

PS: I do take showers almost forgot[:-crazy]

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Since I've been conducting inspections, upon entering a house, the first order of business is to turn the dishwasher on a 'normal' cycle with the soap dish closed. By the time I get to the kitchen, the dishwasher is either done or just about done. I also open the door when it is running to ensure the safety switch is operating and shuts the unit down. About 5% do not operate properly.

Yes, there have been times when it has leaked (and leaked badly), just more reason to run it thru a full cycle, 'unit is leaking, failed under normal test conditions' is my answer when questioned by the homeowner.

As a side note, the NJ standards of practice include the following:

..."Inspector is required to inspect"...

Household appliances limited to:

(1) The kitchen range and oven to determine operation of burners or heating elements excluding microwave ovens and the operation of self-cleaning cycles and appliance timers and thermostats.

(2) Dishwasher to determine water supply and drainage, and

(3) Garbage disposer.

Darren

www.aboutthehouseinspections.com

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Originally posted by Darren

(2) Dishwasher to determine water supply and drainage, and

(3) Garbage disposer.

Darren

www.aboutthehouseinspections.com

Darren,

Speaking of dishwasher discharge line. If it does not have a dedicated p-trap and connects to drain above P-trap with no air gap/drip loop we always report this as a possible health hazard. Of course if the manufactures specifications state there is an anti siphon valve on that particular model then all is well. Just wondering if the reporting of this is wide spread or is something we do locally.

Best regards,

Paul Burrell

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