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Panelboards installed in bathrooms


Joe Tedesco
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Back in 1987 I did a 80,000 sq ft medical office condo building (I was the superintendent).

All the doctors and dentists offices that I completed had the electrical panel mounted in the bathroom. Picture a medicine cabinet mounted on the side wall of where the sink is located, that's where the panel was located.

I questioned the location, wrote up RFI's and even noted it in the job meeting minutes.

It seemed pretty stupid to me....

Every single one was approved by the building & electrical inspectors.

Darren

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Originally posted by Joe Tedesco

How long have electrical panelboards been allowed in bathrooms?

The same question as it relates to the service disconnecting means?

OK, I'll play.

I'm not aware of any rule or code section that prohibits panelboards in bathrooms. As far as I know, they've always been allowed and still are.

However, if you want to put breakers in the panelboards, that's a problem. Overcurrent devices haven't been allowed in bathrooms since the '93 edition.

As for the service disconnect, if it happens to be an overcurrent device, then it hasn't been allowed in a bathroom since '93. If it's not an overcurrent device, than it's ok to put it in a bathroom.

Of course, for the purpose of this discussion, we're talking about bathrooms in dwelling units or guest rooms (or suites) of hotels & motels. The rule doesn't apply to medical office buildings such as the one Darren encountered.

Source: 240.24(E)

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Inspected a condo located in a high rise. The main aervice entrance disconnect cabinet was located in lower parking garage inside wall. Water was leaking down wall both behind and inside service cabinet. By the look of the corrosion it appeared to have been a long term problem. It is amazing to me how complacent the building management and maintenance can be to over look a problem like this.

Paul B.

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Originally posted by Jim Katen

OK, I'll play.

I'm not aware of any rule or code section that prohibits panelboards in bathrooms. As far as I know, they've always been allowed and still are.

However, if you want to put breakers in the panelboards, that's a problem. Overcurrent devices haven't been allowed in bathrooms since the '93 edition.

As for the service disconnect, if it happens to be an overcurrent device, then it hasn't been allowed in a bathroom since '93. If it's not an overcurrent device, than it's ok to put it in a bathroom.

Of course, for the purpose of this discussion, we're talking about bathrooms in dwelling units or guest rooms (or suites) of hotels & motels. The rule doesn't apply to medical office buildings such as the one Darren encountered.

Source: 240.22(E)

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Now, that is helpful information.

I was overlooking the "breaker/no breaker" aspect of the panelboard; I just assumed we were talking breakers, when in reality, I think w/got what Les said, a trick question practitioner. Didactic catechism's tend to stifle the excitement of learning, and lead to other questions having little to do w/the subject @ hand.

Ever had a teacher that would always start the class by plastering the slightly tricky question up on the overhead and never explain it? There's a certain game show aspect to it. Kinda like Alex Trabeck always knowing the answer.

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Originally posted by kurt

. . . when in reality, I think w/got what Les said, a trick question practitioner. Didactic catechism's tend to stifle the excitement of learning, and lead to other questions having little to do w/the subject @ hand.

Ever had a teacher that would always start the class by plastering the slightly tricky question up on the overhead and never explain it? There's a certain game show aspect to it. Kinda like Alex Trabeck always knowing the answer.

Personally, I enjoy trick questions. They keep me alert and help to prevent my wheels from running in ruts.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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My life is a trick question.

I think every home inspection is a trick question. I mean, we have a few hours to look at, oh, a few thousand things, figure out which are the most important, convert our thoughts to a few well chosen coherent sentences, and do it again in the afternoon.

Ruts? This sounds wrong, but a little rut here or there sounds mildly attractive on occasion, given my daily flogging in the game of "Guess the House".

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Originally posted by Joe Tedesco

No tricks, just hoping that someone had a copy of the first time the rule was added to the code.

PS: Bathrooms are defined in Article 100 and when there is no basin in one the rule for the GFCI's is not applicable.

It first appeared in the 1993 edition.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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