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flashing or reynolds wrap


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This house I inspected today was "remodeled" and I'm pretty sure the handyman/flipper must have been high...

Is this flashing material anyone has ever seen? Im new so I am only familar with the sheet metal type. Keep in mind that there was an active leak viewed in the attic around the chimney (roof decking was soaked and rotted.)

Also the chimney in the attic mortar was like sand and falling out in chunks. How would you report this and what would you suggest be done to fix?

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That's a form of peel-n-seal. It's wholly inadequate for what it's being used for and gooping it up with asphalt cement will only cause the bituthene backing to break down.

It's more likely that the water is getting in through the crown and the flue or through worn mortar where the counter flashings had been let into the stack, or though a cracked/missing crown, and is then migrating to the roof framing and decking. What's the top of that stack look like?

Do you still see those T-tab lockdown shingles a lot in North Dakota? They haven't been used regularly around here for over a quarter of a century.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Mike,

Yes I would say 8 out of 10 homes here use the interlocking shingles. Even new construction. I did not walk on the roof due to an abundance of ice (first week it hasnt been below zero). So I cant tell ya what the cap looks like. The mortar was in shbby shape in the attic so I assume its not the best above roof...

Thanks for the input!

Originally posted by hausdok

That's a form of peel-n-seal. It's wholly inadequate for what it's being used for and gooping it up with asphalt cement will only cause the bituthene backing to break down.

It's more likely that the water is getting in through the crown and the flue or through worn mortar where the counter flashings had been let into the stack, or though a cracked/missing crown, and is then migrating to the roof framing and decking. What's the top of that stack look like?

Do you still see those T-tab lockdown shingles a lot in North Dakota? They haven't been used regularly around here for over a quarter of a century.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Originally posted by jodil

Also the chimney in the attic mortar was like sand and falling out in chunks. How would you report this and what would you suggest be done to fix?

Not sure how one gets a chimney into attic mortar. What is attic mortar, anyway?

Most likely the mortar in the chimney is completely shot due to excessive moisture caused by the lack of a liner. Moisture in the combustion gas condenses and eventually demolishes the mortar and brick.

If it's just falling apart, you may need a complete rebuild. It sounds like you definitely need a liner. Both things are expensive.

I'd report it as a major defect needing repair; have a contractor tell the buyer what it would cost.

I could be wrong, but I see a lot of old chimneys......

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Pardon my ignorant choice of words Kurt G. I didnt know our posts were being scrutinized by an English major... I'm pretty sure you know what I meant. The mortar between the bricks in the chimney located in the attic.

better?

Originally posted by kurt

Originally posted by jodil

Also the chimney in the attic mortar was like sand and falling out in chunks. How would you report this and what would you suggest be done to fix?

Not sure how one gets a chimney into attic mortar. What is attic mortar, anyway?

Most likely the mortar in the chimney is completely shot due to excessive moisture caused by the lack of a liner. Moisture in the combustion gas condenses and eventually demolishes the mortar and brick.

If it's just falling apart, you may need a complete rebuild. It sounds like you definitely need a liner. Both things are expensive.

I'd report it as a major defect needing repair; have a contractor tell the buyer what it would cost.

I could be wrong, but I see a lot of old chimneys......

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Nope, not an English major. Of course I knew what you meant, but if you're new to the biz, and you want to survive, here's some good advice.

Don't operate on the assumption that someone knows what you mean. Learn to express yourself in ways that cannot be misunderstood.

Folks saying and doing goofy things, and then being amazed and mildly put out when folks call them on it, is the hallmark of the doofus HI. Get over this as quickly as you can, or some attorney will school you in ways that are much more aggravating than anything that could happen in here.

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I understand your point Kurt.

Thanks for the tough love.. [:-weepn]

Originally posted by kurt

Nope, not an English major. Of course I knew what you meant, but if you're new to the biz, and you want to survive, here's some good advice.

Don't operate on the assumption that someone knows what you mean. Learn to express yourself in ways that cannot be misunderstood.

Folks saying and doing goofy things, and then being amazed and mildly put out when folks call them on it, is the hallmark of the doofus HI. Get over this as quickly as you can, or some attorney will school you in ways that are much more aggravating than anything that could happen in here.

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Jodi,

you "guys" might really benefit from having a report read by another inspector. Five or six of the posters on this board have sent me a representative report to read and were quite surprised by the critique. Couple of them still speak to me!

Kurt's advice is really on point. Mike O gave you some clues and info regarding the mat'ls as did Bill K and Brian G. The brick chimney mortar will be "different" than the exposed mortar above ridge and likely the brick is different. (it is) Maybe same type brick, but bricks that are not chipped, broken cracked etc that were used in the attic space.

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