Jump to content

Little bit of over heating?


Robert Jones
 Share

Recommended Posts

The home I inspected today was built on 1998. 200amp service panel, copper branch wiring, panel is full. When I removed the cover I was quite surprised to find scorching to some of the neutrals. I am guessing that somewhere within the envelope of the home, there is an illegal jump of some sort that might lead to this? Overload? Feedback is greatly appreciated.

Click to Enlarge
tn_2009324203247_IMG_2254%20(Medium).jpg

69.08 KB

Click to Enlarge
tn_2009324203311_IMG_2252%20(Medium).jpg

54.04 KB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rob, in your first photo, there's a conductor that almost appears to be welded to the panel. It doesn't look like it goes anywhere. I'd say they had a major short at some time, probably when someone was working on the panel. All might (stress might) be OK now but I don't see any choice but to defer to an electrician for a thorough check of the panel and associated circuit wiring.

Click to Enlarge
tn_2009324205120_burntneutrals.jpg

75.15 KB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Richard.

I think what your seeing on there is the plastic jacket that is "loose" from the wire itself. I did use a temp control device on the area and it was normal. I even ran the appliances that were listed for those breakers, ie; microwave(countertop) and hood fan. There was no change in the temp. The other 2 breakers were listed for the foyer and computer. I was thinking possibly one or more of the screws were loose. Either way, an electrician will be recommended. Thanks again for your reply.

V/R

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think what your seeing on there is the plastic jacket that is "loose" from the wire itself.

Ahhh, could be! It does still look like arcing emanating from that general area.

In any case, once the electrician has done whatever is needed, there will probably be some remaining discoloration that will give the next inspector pause when your clients eventually sell the house. You might suggest that your clients get documentation from the electrician, fully detailing the repairs and any remaining marks, and tape that to the side of the panel. Frankly, I'm not sure that would satisfy me as the future inspector, but it would help.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The home I inspected today was built on 1998. 200amp service panel, copper branch wiring, panel is full. When I removed the cover I was quite surprised to find scorching to some of the neutrals. I am guessing that somewhere within the envelope of the home, there is an illegal jump of some sort that might lead to this? Overload? Feedback is greatly appreciated.

The installing electrician laid out all of his neutrals and planned to torque them after lunch. Then he forgot. Later someone, not an electrician, noticed a problem and simply tightened up the screws.

An electrician should cut away all of the burnt wires and make up new connections, splicing in new material where necessary. The terminal bar looks like it's ok, but if he feels that it's been damaged by the heat, you can get replacements fairly easily.

An overload tends to overheat the entire wire, not just the connection point.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An electrician should cut away all of the burnt wires and make up new connections, splicing in new material where necessary.

Hi Jim,

No problem with that wherever insulation is damaged, but do you think the discolored grounding conductors actually need replacing? My experience metal-working with copper is that extreme heat makes the material more malleable and easier to work. I wouldn't think it would affect the conducting properties(?).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An electrician should cut away all of the burnt wires and make up new connections, splicing in new material where necessary.

Hi Jim,

No problem with that wherever insulation is damaged, but do you think the discolored grounding conductors actually need replacing? My experience metal-working with copper is that extreme heat makes the material more malleable and easier to work. I wouldn't think it would affect the conducting properties(?).

Would the annealed copper flow more under the pressure of the terminal screw?

I'd recommend replacing all of the burnt wire, if only so that people who look at the panel in the future will know that the issue has been addressed.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...