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While they are apparently striving to raise the bar, NACHI's requirements for continuing education and the knowledge level to join are lower than some other organizations. They do function well as a marketing organization though. In this profession you will find the organizations that are most credible have education and standards rather than marketing at the forefront of their public image.

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Sue,

You just need to visit with some local inspectors in your area. Visit a chapter meeting of a national association in your area, most get more out of their local chapter than from their national organization. The professional association need to fit your needs, we all have different needs and desires.

I have friends in all of the associations, many inspectors belong to multiple associations for the added referral base and exposure.

If you ask me which association I think is best, I would say mine is the best. If I did not like my association I would find another one or just run with the wind and do my own thing.

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Originally posted by crusty

NACHI's requirements for continuing education and the knowledge level to join are lower than some other organizations. They do function well as a marketing organization though. In this profession you will find the organizations that are most credible have education and standards rather than marketing at the forefront of their public image.

Hi Crusty, I fail to see how NACHI has lower continuing education requirements than most associations, when I would say we have higher ones:

http://www.nachi.org/cont_education.htm

We are also still the only trade organization in this industry that has any type of entrance exam.

As to your comments on our marketing prowess, that is coming too close to praise.

Regards

Gerry

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Originally posted by Gerry Beaumont

We are also still the only trade organization in this industry that has any type of entrance exam.

ASHI considers the NHIE an enty level exam, they simply allow you to join without use of thier name and logo until you can gain enough education and experience to pass it.

Brian G.

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Originally posted by Gerry Beaumont

As to your comments on our marketing prowess, that is comming too close to praise.

Regards

Gerry

Sorry if I wasn't clear in my assessment of Nick's industry Gerry. I suppose I could call it an industry because it manufactures certifications. Let me rephrase it for you.

It is my opinion that any professional organization that operates as a profit making center for an owner (as opposed to being non profit and we won't even go into said owner's law scoffing past today), that demeans the word "certified" in an effort to market itself and it's members, whose standards eliminate huge safety issues and whose primary purpose is marketing rather than education and standard setting, oh, and which sees a profession as an industry is not praiseworthy or credible by any stretch of a sane imagination for any reason whatsoever.

Frankly I feel you should continue to refer to what NACHI involves itself with as an industry.

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Originally posted by Jim Morrison

Originally posted by crusty

ASHI now has qualified certified CREIA members for membership in ASHI with no additional testing beyond what they have achieved through CREIA. At the last BOD meeting CREIA reciprocated.

That's right sports fans. Members of CREIA and TAREI need not take the NHIE to become ASHI members. This may start a new thread, but it is a bit of a bombshell that most ASHI members are not aware of and I thought it merited highlighting.

Jim, I'm not sure about CREIA, but for a TAREI member to be accepted as an ASHI Member he has to have TAREI's CPI (Certified Professional Inspector) designation. That means over 1000 inspections and passing a test. The current CPI test is ICC code certification.

I'm a ASHI Member, but I am not a TAREI CPI member. Few TAREI members are CPIs. Another catch for the TAREI CPI is that his reports must meet ASHI SOP. There are enough differences that the TAREI CPI would probably have to change his reporting format. While all the TAREI CPIs I know are well qualified to be ASHI Members, I doubt that many will jump on board. These guys don't need ASHI.

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Originally posted by Jim Morrison

Paul,

My point is that ASHI shouldn't allow anyone to be a member until they have passed the NHIE and granting membership to TAREI and CREIA folks creates a loophole that rubs me wrong.

I have it on extremely credible authority from those who take the time to create the exams that the CREIA exam is more difficult than the NHIE and our annual CEC requirement is 30 which any ASHI member joining CREIA needs to maintain in lieu of the 20 required by ASHI Jim. There was no lowering of the Standards on ASHI's part as far as CREIA goes.
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I know nothing about the CREIA test and don't care a lot about how tough it is since I don't belong. I am an ASHI member and have been promoting the meaning of ASHI membership for most of my life. Being a member of ASHI used to mean passing a certain test (although the test has changed considerably over the years). Now it's a little more nebulous and the reasons behind the softening of the rules bother me more than anything.

Maybe the CREIA test is harder today. Maybe it won't be tomorrow. The point is: ASHI created a loophole and loopholes get exploited early and often. I think it was a mistake and I still do.

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Originally posted by Jim Morrison

Paul,

My point is that ASHI shouldn't allow anyone to be a member until they have passed the NHIE and granting membership to TAREI and CREIA folks creates a loophole that rubs me wrong.

Jim, your's is the first comment I've seen on that. It rubs me the wrong way too. Did you read Steve Gladstone's idiotic rationalization in the current ASHI Reporter?

"We know the testing is seen by many as threatening and expensive," said Gladstone. "Others feel they have already proven their knowledge and business acumen."

Well, lah de freakin' da!

Joe Hancaviz

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IMO, the HI business is changing. For the better? Probably not. It really has become an "industry", just look at all of the businesses that have sprouted up over the years, related to the thing we do. Schools, software companies, tool resellers, insurance companies, mold sluts, answering services. website designers- the list goes on and on.

Here in AZ, there were about 300 inspectors, in the whole state, when licensing went into effect in January 03'. Now, there's closer to 1,500. That means about 1,200 inspectors with less than two years experience.

The market is being flooded with undereducated, inexperienced inspectors, and they are getting work because they come cheap and cow-tow to Realtor's whims.

Big companies are outmarketing the little guys, and the independent inspector is having a tougher and tougher time feeding his family.

The future ain't lookin' too pretty, boys. It's not what the oldtimers envisioned, but it is what it is.

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I think the tide will turn Chris but it takes time. A harbinger of the future? The San Francisco Peninsula has sustained what is probably the hottest real estate market in the country for the past 7 or 8 years along with the highest prices in the country."As-Is" sales are the standard. Open house on Sunday, offers accepted until close of business on Wednesday then we will choose the one we want to accept and will also notify one or two others and place them in back up positions, inspections completed prior to listing...that is the standard. I've seen an interesting change come about, slowly but steadily the agents have changed from getting the weakest inspection they can, to getting the best inspection they can. The reasons are simple. Decreased liability and increased credibility. I think it is the wave of the future but I think things in most places will get worse before they get better. My advice to those who are faced with the onslaught of incompetent competition. Raise your prices, a lot. If you are a better inspector, command a better price and set yourself apart from the competition. Make it known that they are indeed not your competition. I raised prices 3 times in the 12 months and business is still increasing. You will generally get to work with a better class of referers too.

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Hi to all,

I apologize as to my use of English, as I have not yet learned how to speak American, however Websters appears to support my usage of terminology.

Main Entry: in·dus·try

Pronunciation: 'in-(")d&s-trE

Function: noun

Inflected Form(s): plural -tries

Etymology: Middle English industrie skill, employment involving skill, from Middle French, from Latin industria diligence, from industrius diligent, from Old Latin indostruus, perhaps from indu in + -struus (akin to Latin struere to build) -- more at END-, STREW

1 : diligence in an employment or pursuit; especially : steady or habitual effort

2 a : systematic labor especially for some useful purpose or the creation of something of value b : a department or branch of a craft, art, business, or manufacture; especially : one that employs a large personnel and capital especially in manufacturing c : a distinct group of productive or profit-making enterprises d : manufacturing activity as a whole

3 : work devoted to the study of a particular subject or author

Reasonably accurate I thought ?

Main Entry: pro·fes·sion

Pronunciation: pr&-'fe-sh&n

Function: noun

Etymology: Middle English professioun, from Old French profession, from Late Latin & Latin; Late Latin profession-, professio, from Latin, public declaration, from profitEri

1 : the act of taking the vows of a religious community

2 : an act of openly declaring or publicly claiming a belief, faith, or opinion : PROTESTATION

3 : an avowed religious faith

4 a : a calling requiring specialized knowledge and often long and intensive academic preparation b : a principal calling, vocation, or employment c : the whole body of persons engaged in a calling .

Ah, now I see the light !!!

Regards

Gerry

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Gerry,

At least your American has progressed to the point that you use Webster's as a refernce and not that silly OED. My compliments.

The difference between "industry" and "profession" is a matter of semantics. Both are accurate, but profession sounds more professional. That's why I refer to my home inspection "practice" and not my home inspection "company". It's why we say decay instead of rot or a hundred other examples. Communication is what we do, folks, why not do it as well as you can? People don't seem to mind parting with big, fat checks when they are handing them over to someone who sounds like he knows what he's doing.

Nobody is wrong who calls what we do an industry, but it would be mo' better if we all referred to it as a profession. All Mike is trying to do is improve the profession for everyone, and I support it. There are plenty of folks trying to dilute our ranks, I'm all for anything that makes us look, sound, or work better.

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Originally posted by Inspectorjoe

Originally posted by Jim Morrison

Paul,

My point is that ASHI shouldn't allow anyone to be a member until they have passed the NHIE and granting membership to TAREI and CREIA folks creates a loophole that rubs me wrong.

Jim, your's is the first comment I've seen on that. It rubs me the wrong way too. Did you read Steve Gladstone's idiotic rationalization in the current ASHI Reporter?

"We know the testing is seen by many as threatening and expensive," said Gladstone. "Others feel they have already proven their knowledge and business acumen."

Well, lah de freakin' da!

Joe Hancaviz

Joe,

I did read Steve's column and while I think Steve is a smart guy, I was disappointed with his stance. Someone before me said HI orgs are not one-size-fits-all and it's true. There are plenty of orgs out there that want to be the biggest, and I'd be happier if ASHI kept focused on just being the best. Here's hoping next years crop of leaders can shift the emphasis back.

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Originally posted by Jim Morrison

There are plenty of orgs out there that want to be the biggest, and I'd be happier if ASHI kept focused on just being the best. Here's hoping next years crop of leaders can shift the emphasis back.

Amen. I'd rather be "Gucci" than "Wal-Mart".

Brian "Gucci-Gucci" Goodman

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It seems that HI orgs getting along is like asking for world peace!

Unfortunately, in States such as mine, you are forced by law to join a National org. In that case, I think there should be choices and not have one forced down your throat. Hopefully State licensing will change that requirement.

W.

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The problem with the HI Orgs is that they all have different requirements and it is always whose requirements are the best. I think all organizations have a purpose, some are just not up to par with the industry. If NACHI would require a proctored exam and tighten up their roles (we know many should not even be listed) along with dumping Nick (never happen) they have a chance to gain respect in the industry. Until then, they will always find themselves on the defense no matter what kind of spin happy inflated numbers they claim.

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  • 5 weeks later...

Just for your info . . .

I just took the test... I am NOT a Home Inspector, I'm a Painting Contractor, but feel I have a good knowledge of all general fields of basic home construction.

Although I am interested in moving into the Home Inspection field and am hoping to do that soon, I do not feel qualified to perform even my first home inspection as I do not feel that the homeowner would be getting a fair value and the expertise that they deserve and should expect.

I must admit that I took the test very hurriedly since I needed to leave. After completing the test I still had over a half hour left on my time limit but had no time to go back and edit any answers.

Have said all that I still received a final score of 80 and was told that was a passing grade. I hope if there is any licensing requirement in the future in my state, that test will be a lot more difficult than this one.

I guess it's time to hang up my paint brush and hang my Home Inspector shingle [:-graduat

Just teasing. . . I know that the test is not for licensing and you are trying to improve it, etc., etc. Just thought you’d appreciate my feedback.

Home Inspector – Novice Grade

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