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Oil Boiler


Mark P
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Yesterday I came across my 1st oil boiler. The best I can tell is it was manufactured in the late 1950 or early 1960. (American Standard – series 1B-J1 / Acroflame oil burner model DH-5F, series F-1) The house has been vacant for several years and the boiler was completely shut down. I told my customers what I know about them, which is very little and did not even think about trying to operate it.

Does anyone have any useful info on old oil burners I can include in the report?

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No nothing special. I was just looking for any general info someone buying a house with an oil burner would find useful.

I told them I did not know how to light it and I recommend employing a contractor that specializes in oil burners to make sure it is safe to operate.

But since I have your ear Chad.

It was vented into a brick chimney with a clay liner. The top of the clay flue was in terrable condition and I thought maybe as a result of the exhaust.

Does the oil go bad? There a was a large tank 3/4 full that had been there for at least 2 years.

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Mark,

You light it by turning up the thermostat. That big transformer on top of the burner supplies voltage to a pair of electrodes to create a spark to ignite the fuel/air mixture.

The wear at the flue liner is probably from not having a cap on the chimney combined with the products of combustion.

What was the condition of the liner in the combustion chamber?

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Mark,

You light it by turning up the thermostat. That big transformer on top of the burner supplies voltage to a pair of electrodes to create a spark to ignite the fuel/air mixture.

Don't I feel like an ass. Really even with one 45+ years old. Geezz. Honestly 800+ inspections and I have never seen one.

[

What was the condition of the liner in the combustion chamber?

Man I took a couple of sheet metal screws off one of the side panels and the entire surround thingy fell apart. All I could see was the outside of the combustion chamber. I did not know there was a combustion liner; or do you mean the liner in the chimney. The boiler was in such a tight corner I could barely get to the front. I pretty much disclaimed the whole thing. I figure it is better to tell them up front and to their face "I have never seen one of these before and don't know much about them, I'm sorry I cannot be more helpful. It is not a common system around here. You'll need to hire someone who specializes in old boiler systems"

The buyer (in his 70's) was pretty knowledgeable and said the last one he had seen was in his grandfather's house. That made me feel better. He understood, but was a bit disappointed and said “well I guess you can’t be a expert in every systemâ€

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