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Interesting phone call


esch
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Had a phone call yesterday morning that was interesting.

A man called seeking information, help, and some one to work for him.

He needed a inspector that could do code and compliance check for him (He gave a form number as an example but I do not have it with me at this moment).

Said he had a 200 house subdivision ready to be sold off house by house but before he could do so, they had to be inspected by a certified code and compliance (officer?)

Sounds like a city inspector to me putting a green tag on it, but it is outside city limits and had to be complete for the U.S. Government.

That's about all the information he would give at this time.

Said it was similar to FHA loan but wasn't FHA. Maybe some kind of grant.

Said he would be calling me in a few weeks.

Was interesting turn of events, any body ever heard of an item similar?

Matt

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Tell them if they want you to sign off on the houses, the least you will need them to do is:

Review signed & sealed drawings.

Excavate so the footings are visible.

Remove the drywall and insulation for a framing, electrical, plumbing & mechanical inspections.

Ahh; they'll never go for it! [:-monkeyd

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Every now and then I get a call from a person who thinks they need to hire a private inspector such as one of us.

In reality, they need a public AHJ.

John,

I think you may be missing opportunities for inspection work.

There are benefits to the future owner in separating the municipal inspection from a private home inspector. Builders, especially in today's economy, make decisions based on profit instead of quality (there are exceptions, but not many). It is a good idea for a buyer to hire their own inspector (or architect [^]) to work as their advocate during the construction. The building department only checks for "Code Minimum" construction and that may not be the level of quality that is expected.

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Every now and then I get a call from a person who thinks they need to hire a private inspector such as one of us.

In reality, they need a public AHJ.

John,

I think you may be missing opportunities for inspection work.

There are benefits to the future owner in separating the municipal inspection from a private home inspector. Builders, especially in today's economy, make decisions based on profit instead of quality (there are exceptions, but not many). It is a good idea for a buyer to hire their own inspector (or architect [^]) to work as their advocate during the construction. The building department only checks for "Code Minimum" construction and that may not be the level of quality that is expected.

I agree with your statement Steven. That aside, my comment was meant to apply to those cases where there is a requirement by law for a municipal inspector.

I understand that a person can still hire a private inspector and it's usually a good idea.

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There have been a few subdivisions built around here; out of the AHJ areas that the developers required the builder to hire the code inspectors or a home inspector to inspected the homes as they where being built.

The bigger builders hired the city to come out and inspect them; the small time builders hired the home inspectors to do it.

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