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Incipient rot, or something similar?


John Kogel
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These pics are from a tearoff of shake roofing, about a 20 year old roof. North of the Pacific Northwest. At the time of these pics, the area was bone dry. The second pic shows the same area after scraping with a claw hammer. There was a soft, rotted area slightly to the left of center of the branches.

I thought these pics show how this species of wood-destroying fungi will spread between two layers, in this case, between the wood and the roofing paper. The shakes in this part of the roof were still in excellent condition, but some moisture must have accumulated there under the paper to let this growth get started. You can see the thing was still very much alive, just resting.

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That pale yellow fungi spreading its reizomorphs is Poria Incrassata; or, as I like to call it, AIDS for wood.

You'd better get a very aggressive borate treatment regimen going there or that stuff is going to continue to move. It's just about the only danged fungi that, despite what the academics say, seems to be able to spread using nothing more than the ambient moisture in the air.

Jeff Morrell, a rot specialist/researcher down in Oregon, once told me that when I probe that stuff with a pick I should wipe the pick off with alcohol before I allow it to touch healty wood. I think that's a little too extreme but I got his point.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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That pale yellow fungi spreading its reizomorphs is Poria Incrassata; or, as I like to call it, AIDS for wood.

You'd better get a very aggressive borate treatment regimen going there or that stuff is going to continue to move. It's just about the only danged fungi that, despite what the academics say, seems to be able to spread using nothing more than the ambient moisture in the air.

Jeff Morrell, a rot specialist/researcher down in Oregon, once told me that when I probe that stuff with a pick I should wipe the pick off with alcohol before I allow it to touch healty wood. I think that's a little too extreme but I got his point.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Thanks, Mike. that sounds pretty incipient, alright.

Morrell is an appropriate name for a mushroom expert. [:)]

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I'll bet dollars to doughnuts that the fiberglass insulation stuffed right up against the skip is preventing it from drying properly and contributing to that rot.

Right. That dormer had a vaulted ceiling, but the wall to the left was only 6 feet tall. We added 2 feet to that wall and eliminated the dorky dormer. So Mr. Poria had to find a new home.

I hear he caught a gust of wind and flew to Louisiana. [:)]

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