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Type X gypsum on ceiling


czarcone
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Just curious about the recommendation for a fire resistant material installed on the exposed wood members above a heating system. Seems like a good idea, but does it have any code roots? Is it a typical manufacturer’s requirement? Can anyone shed any light on it’s history?

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Hi,

I'm not sure what you're talking about. I'm not aware of any requirement for a ceiling over a heating system. If memory serves, we beat this around about a year ago and the upshot of it was that you can even have a furnace room in a house that is completely open to the attic above a furnace.

How about all of those furnaces installed in attics in other parts of the country?

OT - OF!!!

M.

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No, we got it here in the Big Dirty too. I think it was something from the 30's thru the 50's. I see a lot of old houses w/a "firebreak" over the heating equipment.

The old ones have metal lath plaster, the "newer" ones from the 50's have drywall. A few have a transite/asbestos sheet.

I will always hate those furnaces in the attics w/ nothing around them though; just isn't right somehow.

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Originally posted by kurt

No, we got it here in the Big Dirty too. I think it was something from the 30's thru the 50's. I see a lot of old houses w/a "firebreak" over the heating equipment.

I often see this condition but for extra safety they have a glass bulb full of liquid that is held in place by solder that will melt and allow the bulb to drop on the floor, break, and the liquid will put out the fire (NOT!).

I always wondered what chemical is in these bulbs and if it is dangerous.

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Originally posted by czarcone

Sorry for not elaborating Mike.

It's very typical here to find an oil-fired boiler in a basement with drywall covering an area of exposed floor joists directly above the boiler. Maybe just a regional trade practice?

In MA, a sheetrock or plaster ceiling used to be required over oil fired boilers, furnaces, and water heaters. Newer installations do not require them because there is something in the burner (a thermal switch?) that shuts them down if they catch fire. If an oil burner has a yellow Energy Efficiency sticker, the sheetrock ceiling is redundant.

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I often see this condition but for extra safety they have a glass bulb full of liquid that is held in place by solder that will melt and allow the bulb to drop on the floor, break, and the liquid will put out the fire (NOT!).

I always wondered what chemical is in these bulbs and if it is dangerous.

We've had this discussion before, but I'm blanking on the name; I think it's carbon tetrachloride, & yes, it's dangerous. Periodically, we have "amnesty" days here in Evanston where you can turn in environmental nasties; there's always a couple of those red bulbs. One year there was an entire liter of mercury.....

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Originally posted by inspecthistoric. . . They typically contain carbon tetrachloride which have both short term and chronic health concerns. The EPA considers it probable carcinogen.

One of the many exotic jobs I had as a kid was "lane boy" at the local bowling alley. I was in charge of oiling the lanes and maintaining the oiling machine. I had to wash down the machine and the rag oil applicators with carbon tet. I was up to my elbows in the stuff daily for two years straight.

It's taken thirty years for the health effects to show up, but they're undeniable. My hair has turned gray and is thinning on top, I've developed quite a growth around my middle section and I complain, frequently, about the government. Undoubtedly the results of carbon tet exposure.

I'm thinking of suing the bowling alley.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by Jim Katen

Originally posted by inspecthistoric. . . They typically contain carbon tetrachloride which have both short term and chronic health concerns. The EPA considers it probable carcinogen.

One of the many exotic jobs I had as a kid was "lane boy" at the local bowling alley. I was in charge of oiling the lanes and maintaining the oiling machine. I had to wash down the machine and the rag oil applicators with carbon tet. I was up to my elbows in the stuff daily for two years straight.

It's taken thirty years for the health effects to show up, but they're undeniable. My hair has turned gray and is thinning on top, I've developed quite a growth around my middle section and I complain, frequently, about the government. Undoubtedly the results of carbon tet exposure.

I'm thinking of suing the bowling alley.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Funny but I don't ever remember being a pin boy. Who do I sue?

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