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John Kogel

Do I need a psychrometer, or a hygrometer?

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After reading through all the product descriptions, I still don't know which humidity meter I want.

I've used the Fluke and liked it, but would be quite happy with a lower priced unit for just an occasional helper,, to measure relative humidity in a living space or attic. Any suggestions?

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After reading through all the product descriptions, I still don't know which humidity meter I want.

I've used the Fluke and liked it, but would be quite happy with a lower priced unit for just an occasional helper,, to measure relative humidity in a living space or attic. Any suggestions?

Amprobe makes one that can be bought for about $85. It's decent if not outstanding.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Thanks Jim and Dave. I was admiring that Amprobe unit, like a red Fluke with a 9 volt battery.

I now know that I want a digital hygrometer, which uses capacitance measurements. The psycrometer measures evaporation using a wet wick.

Don't want to walk around with a wet wick, do I. [:)]

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Something I learned at that IR seminar last week - Amprobe was apparently acquired by Fluke.

I knew that their manufacturing facilities were both located in Everett, WA but I guess I just didn't make the connection. One of these days I'm going to try and wrangle a factory tour.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Something I learned at that IR seminar last week - Amprobe was apparently acquired by Fluke.

I knew that their manufacturing facilities were both located in Everett, WA but I guess I just didn't make the connection. One of these days I'm going to try and wrangle a factory tour.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Screw the factory tour! How's about a training day like at Watts?

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Something I learned at that IR seminar last week - Amprobe was apparently acquired by Fluke.

I knew that their manufacturing facilities were both located in Everett, WA but I guess I just didn't make the connection. One of these days I'm going to try and wrangle a factory tour.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Screw the factory tour! How's about a training day like at Watts?

The Watts thing was, what, 2-1/2 days? They make a product and build a system that we get to inspect. Fluke and Amprobe don't make a product we get to inspect. They do make infrared imagers, though. Is that what you are thinking about?

I guess before we approached them about it I'd like to know how many folks would be interested in participating locally and how many would be willing to fly in from other parts of the country, like we did when we went out to Springfield for the Watts gig, and what they'd like to learn.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Put together a factory seminar like the Watts gig, I'd go in a blink.

I've got a Fluke 914 Hygrometer and an IR imager; they'd have to have something good going on for training, wouldn't you think?

I would love a "Multimeter for Home Inspectors" seminar. I've got one, but I know I don't use a fraction of its capabilities.

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Thanks Jim and Dave. I was admiring that Amprobe unit, like a red Fluke with a 9 volt battery.

I now know that I want a digital hygrometer, which uses capacitance measurements. The psycrometer measures evaporation using a wet wick.

Don't want to walk around with a wet wick, do I. [:)]

Digital psychrometers don't use a wick.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Make that a Fluke 971.....the temperature and humidity meter.

It seems to do the trick for this biz quite well. Does the Amprobe provide the same sort of performance?

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Make that a Fluke 971.....the temperature and humidity meter.

It seems to do the trick for this biz quite well. Does the Amprobe provide the same sort of performance?

The Fluke has a backlit display and a memory function and its probably more robust when it comes to being dropped, kicked, & stepped on.

Otherwise, they'll both tell you relative humidity and wet bulb & dry bulb temperatures. Those are the essentials.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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OK,

Well, I was looking around their site and they do have training partnerships with various entities. I'm not sure that TIJ would count as an entity but perhaps we can figure something out. I noted last week at that other training that they'd alliled with that energy auditor association or whatever it is and that it nets a 20% price reduction on Fluke products.

What about a level I IR course taught here by the Snell group - the outfit they contract training to - that included an IR imager? Attendees arrive, get issued their imagers and then go through the 3-4 days of training and head home. If it could be done at a decent price would folks who're thinkinb about making the leap be willing to commit to that?

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Thanks Jim and Dave. I was admiring that Amprobe unit, like a red Fluke with a 9 volt battery.

I now know that I want a digital hygrometer, which uses capacitance measurements. The psycrometer measures evaporation using a wet wick.

Don't want to walk around with a wet wick, do I. [:)]

Digital psychrometers don't use a wick.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

In that case, is there an advantage to the hygrometer over the psychrometer?

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Thanks Jim and Dave. I was admiring that Amprobe unit, like a red Fluke with a 9 volt battery.

I now know that I want a digital hygrometer, which uses capacitance measurements. The psycrometer measures evaporation using a wet wick.

Don't want to walk around with a wet wick, do I. [:)]

Digital psychrometers don't use a wick.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

In that case, is there an advantage to the hygrometer over the psychrometer?

In this case, the two words are meaningless. They're related to marketing, not science.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Make that a Fluke 971.....the temperature and humidity meter.

It seems to do the trick for this biz quite well.

A while back I ordered a Testo 610. Nice unit, very small, found it for $110 on eBay. Then later, for no apparent reason, I ordered a completely different item and a Fluke 971 came in the same box as a freebie.

I always get them both out and turn them on together. They often start as much as 5 degrees apart and 5% or more off on RH, and then migrate to readings that are very close, but never exactly the same. It can take several minutes. The Fluke is advertised as having a response time of under a minute, but I'm not so sure.

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