Jump to content

Access Panel - Showers / Bathtup


monte
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have always though that an access panel was required behind a shower or bathtub to be able to repair a fixture. Is there a Code on that issue or has it gone away because of drywall being installed instead of walls of plaster. There was a Court Case that a Home Inspector was sued over and lost because of the over flow drain on the bathtub was never connected by the original home builder and the new owner left the water running in there bathtub and the water damaged there ceiling.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by monte

I have always though that an access panel was required behind a shower or bathtub to be able to repair a fixture. Is there a Code on that issue or has it gone away because of drywall being installed instead of walls of plaster.

There's no such requirement. I don't know that there ever was, though at one time it was common.

There was a Court Case that a Home Inspector was sued over and lost because of the over flow drain on the bathtub was never connected by the original home builder and the new owner left the water running in there bathtub and the water damaged there ceiling.

I'm sure there was. There've been lots of court cases where home inspectors were sued and lost. Welcome to the profession.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Steven Hockstein

Access is still required to service whirlpool equipment.

And sometimes, it's even provided!

What I'm seeing more often than not is a tiny little hatch that provides access to the GFCI outlet that the pump is plugged into, but no motor/pump access.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by kurt

Originally posted by Steven Hockstein

Access is still required to service whirlpool equipment.

And sometimes, it's even provided!

What I'm seeing more often than not is a tiny little hatch that provides access to the GFCI outlet that the pump is plugged into, but no motor/pump access.

I regularly see whirlpool tubs that have no ready access under the tub. They put marble fronts on the tub that are fully caulked and sealed. The fronts can be removed, but that doesn't fit my definition of readily accessible without damaging surfaces.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I hate to wait for tubs to fill to the overflow, and I'm always worried about leaving them to fill and forgetting to check(insert senility joke here). I've come up with a little trick that makes my life much easier. All it is is a 10" piece of 1 1/4 PEX with about at 3/4" vertical strip removed. I carry two of them anyway because I use them to protect my telescopic ladder when I lean it against a roof.

They are beneficial because:

1. Saves time

2. Shoots water into the overflow so you can see if the top part of the overflow leaks

3. Eliminates forgetting to turn off tub

4. Your arm doesn't get wet up to the elbow from draining the tub

5. Also works on sink overflows

6. You can control the amount of water in case there IS a leak

7. Saves time

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif overflow thingy1.JPG

153.15 KB

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif overflow thingy2.JPG

134.22 KB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by chrisprickett

. . . They are beneficial because:

1. Saves time

2. Shoots water into the overflow so you can see if the top part of the overflow leaks

3. Eliminates forgetting to turn off tub

4. Your arm doesn't get wet up to the elbow from draining the tub

5. Also works on sink overflows

6. You can control the amount of water in case there IS a leak

7. Saves time

8. Improves your aim when using a low toilet.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Jim Katen

Originally posted by chrisprickett

. . . They are beneficial because:

1. Saves time

2. Shoots water into the overflow so you can see if the top part of the overflow leaks

3. Eliminates forgetting to turn off tub

4. Your arm doesn't get wet up to the elbow from draining the tub

5. Also works on sink overflows

6. You can control the amount of water in case there IS a leak

7. Saves time

8. Improves your aim when using a low toilet.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

9. For those that have been cut on the bias.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I happen to buy the Code Check Plumbing Second Edition and the answer is located on page 10 "Trap Arms" also shown in Fig. 27 . The answer under the IRC 2704.1 & 3201.1 and UPC 405.2 Sections is " Slip joints must be accessible, min 12in X 12in opening" I am sure that the UBC requires that construction meets the UPC code requirements also.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by monte

I happen to buy the Code Check Plumbing Second Edition and the answer is located on page 10 "Trap Arms" also shown in Fig. 27 . The answer under the IRC 2704.1 & 3201.1 and UPC 405.2 Sections is " Slip joints must be accessible, min 12in X 12in opening" I am sure that the UBC requires that construction meets the UPC code requirements also.

Well, of course, but that's not the answer to your original question. Rather than use slip joints, plumbers use cemented joints in inaccessible areas. Been like that for over 30 years now. Before that, at least in my area, we had Durham fittings with tapped and threaded joints for concealed areas.

I'd strongly suggest you not use that cite to recommend adding a 12 x 12 opening. They'll probably open it up to find all glued-up joints.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jim, you are right about not recommending a access panel.. My concerned was getting sue and losing because the piping behind the tub and shower were inaccessible, just like most drain pipes in a basement that has been finished or a second story bathroom drainage pipe system. We have no knowledge that the plumber installed the tub with slip joints or threaded. with out a access panel or being there when the system was installed. The original tub could have been installed with threaded joints but could have been replaced with a new tub enclosure that had a different height and placement of the overflow drain and the plumber or the homeowner was too lazy to install the proper length pipe.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by monte

Jim, you are right about not recommending a access panel.. My concerned was getting sue and losing because the piping behind the tub and shower were inaccessible, just like most drain pipes in a basement that has been finished or a second story bathroom drainage pipe system. We have no knowledge that the plumber installed the tub with slip joints or threaded. with out a access panel or being there when the system was installed. The original tub could have been installed with threaded joints but could have been replaced with a new tub enclosure that had a different height and placement of the overflow drain and the plumber or the homeowner was too lazy to install the proper length pipe.

Worrying about the stuff that's inaccessible is a waste of good worry-time. Worry about the stuff you can see.

Not to make you worry more, but what about electrical receptacles? How do you know that the receptacle yokes aren't just screwed to the wall board with all the wiring just hanging in the wall cavity and coverplates on top of them hiding the whole mess?

Someone could sue you over that.

- Jim Katen

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...