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John Kogel

My old Forney welder

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I imagine it's worth more as scrap, it might weigh close to 200 lbs, but it is a bomb-proof AC welder from the 50's, and I've got 20' cables for it too.

I bought it for $125 back in the eighties when I was ranching oysters. Built some neat stuff and repaired trailers and such. It is also more interesting than any of my recent inspections.

I blew the cobwebs out of it with the leaf blower the other day so I could fabricate an axle for my canoe trolley project. Packing a canoe on my head just isn't fun anymore. The only moving part is the big old knife switch and it is in great shape. It just needs to be dry when you turn it on to keep the windings from arcing out. I used to dry it out with a heat lamp when I had a project in mind. Nowadays I'm using it to hold up a bench in a much drier and cleaner shop. It's a good old relic.

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Are the rectifiers on the battery charger section still good?

I've a more recent version. It has a continuously variable voltage output instead of a series of taps on the transformer. About 45 years old.

Marc

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I have more than a handful of welders, but I use that exact machine as

as often as I use any of the other arc machines. It produces a clean, high quality arc even by today's standards.

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I have a similar one in my mother-in-laws garage out in East Texas from her now passed husband. He had given it to me many years ago and I've never hauled it into town.

I'll be checking into the data plate and likely bring it home in next week or two.

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The voltage regulation is a crucial factor in how easily the arc can be maintained after the initial strike. Better voltage regulation comes at a high price because it entails larger conductors on the transformer (both primary and secondary). John K says his welder might weigh close to 200 Lbs. That's more of an indication of good voltage regulation than a burden in carrying it around.

They don't make them like they used to.

John might not think it's worth much, but to someone who understands that kind of equipment, it's likely worth more than the new ones coming out today, assuming the winding insulation is undamaged and still in good condition.

Marc

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I have more than a handful of welders, but I use that exact machine as

as often as I use any of the other arc machines. It produces a clean, high quality arc even by today's standards.

Having seen pics of some of your projects, that is quite an endorsement for this old buzz box. It's a keeper, for sure.

I've never used a DC welder. Why is DC considered better? Is it easier to get a steady bead with a lower setting?

I know there are rods that I can't use for AC. I just pick up a small pack of 613's or 611's for the junk I build. The rods I used the other day actually had little specks of mold on them, but they welded ok.

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I've never used a DC welder. Why is DC considered better? Is it easier to get a steady bead with a lower setting?

For big (1/2 thick and up) stuff, I use DC or DC reverse polarity- you can get better penetration with a lot less splatter while keeping the bead fairly narrow. It's moderately easier to weld vertically and overhead with DC as well. For general purpose cobbing I'm partial to 7018 and 9018 rods.

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I've never used a DC welder. Why is DC considered better? Is it easier to get a steady bead with a lower setting?

For big (1/2 thick and up) stuff, I use DC or DC reverse polarity- you can get better penetration with a lot less splatter while keeping the bead fairly narrow. It's moderately easier to weld vertically and overhead with DC as well. For general purpose cobbing I'm partial to 7018 and 9018 rods.

"Better penetration with a lot less splatter . . . "

This is DEFINITELY something I need to look into . . .

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Sometimes, I wonder where your mind is, John.

Well, but if I told you, best-case scenario if you would avoid me in a large way. Worst-case, is that the knowledge would lead you to self immolation.

Some things are better left unsaid . . .

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