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I'am researching becoming a home inspector. I want to do it correctly and as professionally as possible. I am in Wichita Kansas and having a hard time finding the best course. There are no current regulations in Kansas now so it's kind of fuzzy. is one association better than the other? Will there ever be any regulations and state licensing in kansas? thanks in advance for any help as I am very new to this and just beginning to learn.

Eric

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Eric, I am not from Kansas, so can't help much with specifics there.

I am curious why you are looking into home inspections? Every inspector will have their own idea which organization is the "best". My advice is to look around the real estate community, other inspectors and the web to find out which has been around the longest, has impecable standards and code of ethics. I believe ethics and education are the most important tools to have. As I have never personally attended any "school" I can't tell you which is the best. I can tell you which schools have prepared inspectors that work for my company; ITA and AHIT. Both did a fair job. If you enter this business be ready to READ, READ, and LEARN. Then read some more! If you like, e/m me for more personal thoughts.

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Eric, everything that Les has said and I will add this; You need to allow 3 years for your business to get going. Do not jump into this on a shoestring budget. You should allow around $15,000 for startup cost and then whatever you will need to live on. Do not plan on making a living off of home inspections for your first couple of years, it takes time to build your business. Sorry for not sugar coating this but this is not as easy of a profession as many think it is. Out of 100 who start a HI company this year only 25 will be around next year. Out of those 25 only 10 will be around the second year. Out of those 10 only 7 will be around in the third year.

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Eric,

Everything Les and Scott said and more... Keep studying and read through some of the old threads and forum discussions on this board and others like it. I learned more that way than you could imagine. Plus on a positive note I'm one of the seven. Tough it out plan ahead find out your weak spots (roofing, electrical, plumbing, etc.) If you can take a job with a reputable company or just go on jobs with them and offer to help in return for a little education. Books are great but I like submersion best. Enjoy it!

sorry for the wind

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Originally posted by Eric

I'am researching becoming a home inspector. I want to do it correctly and as professionally as possible.

1. Spend 20 years working in the trades.

2. Take courses in engineering, building science and, if you need it, writing.

3. Attend ITA's long course.

4. Apprentice yourself for two or three years to a successful home inspector in an area that's close, but not too close, to the area where you intend to eventually work.

(OK, if you're in a hurry, you can only do 10 years in the trades, but be sure you've done (hands on) concrete foundations and flatwork, framing, roofing, siding, plumbing, electrical and HVAC. Make sure that in the capacity of general contractor or, at least, supervisor, you've overseen the construction of at least one house from beginning to end.)

That would make you a darn good home inspector. Lots of people do it with less, but the vast majority of them fail. I think Scott Patterson's numbers are too optimistic.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by Jim Katen

Make sure that in the capacity of general contractor or, at least, supervisor, you've overseen the construction of at least one house from beginning to end.

I hired my brother (and an occasional subcontractor) and built my house myself, but I wish I had done it after I had training and experience in home inspection. My experiences in the field so far suggest that many general contractors have large and numerous holes in thier trade knowledge (around here anyway). I call that "job security". [;)]

Brian G.

Did I Say "My" House? I Meant Mrs. Goodman's House, Of Course. [:-dunce]

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Eric,

You are talking to some of the best home inspectors in the country. I whsh I had this pool of knowledge when I started it would have been a lot cheaper. Go through the arcives on this site, you will come across some BS but 95% of it is great stuff, you'll know the difference.

Good Luck

Bruce

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