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SEC Splice in Service Panel


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I don't think I have seen this before. The SEC is tapped in the service panel before it goes to the main disconnect. It then goes to the main disconnect and the new spliced SEC heads to another panel service disconnect. It this OK?

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Maybe this would apply?

312.8 Enclosures for Switches or Overcurrent Devices.

Enclosures for switches or overcurrent devices shall not be

used as junction boxes, auxiliary gutters, or raceways for

conductors feeding through or tapping off to other switches

or overcurrent devices, unless adequate space for this purpose

is provided. The conductors shall not fill the wiring

space at any cross section to more than 40 percent of the

cross-sectional area of the space, an6 the conductors,

splices, and taps shall not fill the wiring space at any cross

section to more than 75 percent of the cross-sectional area

of that space.

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I don't think I have seen this before. The SEC is tapped in the service panel before it goes to the main disconnect. It then goes to the main disconnect and the new spliced SEC heads to another panel service disconnect. It this OK?

If the SEC is tapped, before it lands on the main lugs, then you've got two service panels there and two service disconnects. There's no one thing called a "main."

Personally, I don't see a problem with it. 312.8 allows this if adequate space for this purpose is present. Obviously, there's plenty of space. Some might argue that that space isn't "for this purpose" but I disagree.

If I had a concern with those taps it would be with whether or not the split bolts were listed for use with three conductors.

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As far as I know, taps on the SEC are permitted but they're supposed to be in a gutter box, not in a main panel board.

But they're not *in* the panelboard. The thing in the photo is a load center. It includes a panelboard mounted in an enclosure. Unless there's something from the manufacturer that prohibits splices in these enclosures, I'm not aware of anything in the NEC that would prohibit it.

We make splices in little bitty receptacle boxes, switch boxes, and ceiling boxes, why not make them in the much more commodious service panel box?

(Of course, in Canada, this would be prohibited.)

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