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Skylight Install Labor Estimate


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What type of skylight? Some are curb mounted and you can simply unscrew the existing and install the new. Others are deck mounted and have flashing tied directly into them, so you would need to strip shingles and replace them if you wanted to remove an existing skylight.

Last year I re-flashed an incorrectly installed Velux 3048 curb-mounted unit on a 5:12 roof with architectural shingles. Remove the light, set it aside, peel back the shingles, tie in new felt, re-flash and re-shingle. Took a day. I bought one bundle of shingles and the Velux flashing kit, provided a bit of 30# felt, some coil stock, etc. About $750 including the materials, disposal, etc. Around here it could be had for under $500 to over $1000.

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A low pitched shingle roof skylight with no curb sounds like a perpetual leaker. They really should look to raising the skylight so the water can run around on flashing - curb it.

No so. I just looked at a no-curb skylight a few hours ago for a friend that's leaking for the first time in 25 years. A roofer changed the roof covering perhaps 10 years ago, slathered roofing cement all around the window despite stepped flashing and now the crap has dried out and has broken its bond with the window. With the bottom slathered as well, the water has nowhere to go except inside.

Marc

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I recently inspected a flat roof that had 4 Velux skylights (VS model if I recall correctly) installed on raised, level, curbs. I always thought they needed to be installed with some slope as well, but according to Velux, they do not. Velux does recommend installing them with a slope, but it is not required.

Caulking around the glass, like the one in the photo above, could be a sign of a failed seal. It also could be contributing to condensation, as the drainage channels are now at least partially blocked. Either way, it's done!

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I recently inspected a flat roof that had 4 Velux skylights (VS model if I recall correctly) installed on raised, level, curbs. I always thought they needed to be installed with some slope as well, but according to Velux, they do not. Velux does recommend installing them with a slope, but it is not required.

They state their current skylight line can be installed at 0:12, but their flashing kits have a minimum slope.
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I recently inspected a flat roof that had 4 Velux skylights (VS model if I recall correctly) installed on raised, level, curbs. I always thought they needed to be installed with some slope as well, but according to Velux, they do not. Velux does recommend installing them with a slope, but it is not required.

They state their current skylight line can be installed at 0:12, but their flashing kits have a minimum slope.

Fair enough

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At 17 years old it is likely leaking at the glazing boot. The current version of that light can be installed down to 3/12 with step flashing, the previous version to 4/12. The version before that would have needed a sloped curb kit for anything lower than 5/12.

Dave's price is about right, but if I weren't providing the replacement unit I'd add a couple hundred bucks. My labor rates always go up if I have no margin on the parts.

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In my area where it can rain any day of the year, and it can snow a bit too, a skylight has to have a curb or it is a leaker. With a curb, it will still leak, but not as easily.

In my youth, I laid the side windows from a 1951 GMC flat on a plank roof with some roll roofing and tar and they didn't leak, but it was still a bad, temporary design.

A high curb will stay dry longer and come out of the snow faster.

Also, when I see caulking smeared everywhere, it doesn't mean he found the leak. It means he didn't find the leak. [:)]

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Curb. Period. Anyone talking no curb lights is asking for trouble.

I'll rant a little.....

Years ago, I and my best bud thought we'd be the skylite kings of Chicago; we'll just do skylites. Everything was fine until we tried to expand beyond us doing the installs. It proved too hard to train folks that would hang around; as soon as someone got competent, they'd go off on their own, similar to the inspection biz.

I've installed over a hundred, easy. I've got 6 on my current home. Step by step meticulous installation, they don't leak. Ever. Curb is part of meticulous. So is IWS. They last longer than the roof cover; when the roof cover is replaced, you redo the glazing and touch up the flashing, if necessary.

Anyone arguing no curb and no pitch hasn't been around long enough. There's a reason Velux recommends pitch and provides it on their flashing packages.

We still do some skylites, but only in Lincoln Park where they'll pay for quality. The lite you describe would be about $1500-2000 with a guarantee. It takes a full day.

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