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Wade M

ASHI or AHIT

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I have finally made my mind up; I'm going to try to break into the profession! Something I have been kicking around for a long time. I would like to get some" nonsalesman" opinions on which training may or may not be better. I have an AHIT in my state, but the overall cost to attend the ASHI school is about the same. I have been leaning towards ASHI because of the whole learning by doing pitch. When I speak to them on the phone, they both sell themselves well.

Wade

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There's this big fella, name of Mike O'Handley, used to have a school about 4 hrs west of you. Awful good at what he does. Don't know if he's still at it.

Marc

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I wouldn't put much credence in either "school". They're jerry built quasi-educational entities creating bum wads for inspection product vendors to sell stuff to.

(ASHI member for 27 years, but I gotta be honest. The ASHI School sucks, and so does AHIT.)

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It depends on your expectations. If you enter into this with the idea that you will attend the school and come out the other end qualifed to be a home inspector, then you'll be disappointed.

Instead, think if it as the first step in a stairway.

I've never attended either school, but I suspect that either one will provide you with your money's worth of information and training. Just don't expect it to be the end of your training. No one can train you for this job over the course of a few weeks.

Attend either one, learn what you can from them, and continue learning afterward.

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It's a licensed State, the "schooling" is mandatory.

Pick the one that best fits your needs; the schedule, the timing, and the distance you'll need to travel are just as important as any of their content.

If you finish with an idea of how much you still need to learn you'll be on the right track.

Good luck.

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Yes, Ezra does have the right idea. And, Raymond is correct that you need classroom time to satisfy your licensing requirements.

If you don't know anything about home inspection, you have to learn what you don't know before any education will be helpful. If Mr. O's still in the business, go there. If not, go where he tells you to go.

The ASHI School was never fully formed when it was brought to life, it's gone through transitions that don't speak well of it's educational rigor, and it's a lot of money to learn things you could pick up on your own if you have some idea of where to start.

AHIT is just plain horrible. Don't waste your money. Expect happy graduates of AHIT to completely disagree with me.

Both probably satisfy the State requirements, but check to make sure.

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Providers

Here is a list of the "approved" course providers for getting your license in WA state. I have a recent graduate working with me and all I can say is just remember, it is simply class room training you are getting. Be sure to request someone with years of experience to do your ride along with(also a part of the licensing requirement). Don't buy the report software that AHIT is pushing to trainee's in their program. Most inspectors don't care for it.

Feel free to call me if you have any questions.

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I spoke with Wade yesterday and recommended he check out Bellingham Tech's course. It provides the 120 hours of classwork needed plus the 40 hours of mentoring for about the same cost as the others. Most of the comments I've heard about the course have been positive. Can't say that for any of the others.

Marc, I don't have a school. I teach one course for North Seattle Community College called Introduction to Home Inspections. The class doesn't teach people to be inspectors; it's meant to give the student an understanding of what inspections are, what the scope and limitations are, an understanding of the ethical challenges and moral dilemmas inspectors are sometimes faced with and insight into some of the machinations and dirty tricks of manipulative agents.

It's attended by those who are taking the real estate license and appraiser courses there. The students are typically realtors, lenders, insurance agents, appraiser students, property managers and investors and sometimes one or two wannabe inspectors. So far, as soon as the wannabe's have figured out that getting into this gig is a slog through a minefield they've either dropped out or have opted to do something else by the end of the course.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Mike

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Thank you guys, I really appreciate the advice. After talking to Mike, I contacted Steve Smith the lead Instructor at Bellingham Tec. It was nice to talk to a actual Inspector rather that a salesman like the other two schools. After my conversations with both Mike and Steve, decision came easy. I will be attending the Bellingham course in February.

Thanks, Wade

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I am just curious. Does any state licensing board require that the recipient of a license be able to read and write? Georgia law requires that a written report be provided. It does not require that the inspector write the report.

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I am just curious. Does any state licensing board require that the recipient of a license be able to read and write? Georgia law requires that a written report be provided. It does not require that the inspector write the report.

MD requires the applicant to have a high school diploma. That's probably the case in most states; these days that doesn't guarantee you can read or write.

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In Louisiana, there's no reading/writing skills required, though you must have read the SOP and COE in addition to taking the NHIE. I don't see how you can pass it if you can't read the questions and the proctor won't allow someone to accompany you to read the questions to you...I think. As for writing requirements, if you can't write, someone needs to fill out the application for licensure. That seems to be about it.

You do have to write reports but a 'click click' or 'tap tap' report seems kosher. [:-paperba

The kicker is this: There's a 'report writing' class required of new inspectors but it's all about your liabilities in this gig. It has nothing at all to do with report writing skills.

Marc

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Hi,

Ditto in Washington State. The inspector must first take and pass a 120 hour course of instruction. The courses are vetted. They have written tests and report writing requirements in the courses. If one can't pass the course, one can't go onto the next step which is to do forty hours of inspections with a licensed inspector and complete five written reports that comply fully with the standard of practice. Then there is the third step which is the National Home Inspector Exam. The exam is written and if the inspector can't read, or his/her reading comprehension is poor, the inspector isn't likely to pass the test.

Since an inspector can't even apply for a license until those first three steps are completed, I think the reedin' an' ritin' part is cuver'd.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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I am just curious. Does any state licensing board require that the recipient of a license be able to read and write? Georgia law requires that a written report be provided. It does not require that the inspector write the report.

I thought GA was one of the states that does not license home inspectors?

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