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Newer Shower Enclosures


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Seeing a lot where the *fixed* glass panel next to the swinging glass shower door, large/wide fixed panels, are only held in place on one side and along the bottom. No upper track and no support at other side. I can wobble these suckers back & forth like all get-out, and I worry kids will lean on 'em, or someone will slip and fall against 'em, and the panel will crack/fall/shatter or some such.

Anyone know what I mean, and any thoughts on such? Again, to me, this is a relatively new type of panel install. (Yes, I realize it's tempered/safety glass, but still . . .)

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I had a project earlier this year where among other things that was a compliant I was called out to investigate. I did find a recommended practice regarding the maximum size of the fixed panel. I don't recall what it is. Also, I found that diagonal braces are sold that can be attached to the top of the panel to make it more rigid. Never seen one used.

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Ben you're saying that the glass flexed three inches ?!

I've been seeing these frameless showers for years, and they are always a heavy thickness of glass.

Pretty sure he means the entire, rigid panel, can be wobbled back and forth three inches laterally either way. That's what I'm finding - or worse - and what I worry about.

As far as a fix, an upper track isn't being used anymore, probably for aesthetics. Some sort of upper track should be installed IMHO.

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The ones I see have been solidly secure. Glass flexes (maybe) a 1/4". If the whole thing isn't secure, why wouldn't the recommendation be to secure or reinstall the panel?

What about doors? All the doors I see are no frame, 2 pin hinges, no bracing, no nothing, and it moves. Why would a panel need reinforcement but not a door?

I think if it's a solidly installed panel, they're fine.

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I agree they should be quite ridged, but they still give me pause when mostly freestanding. I had a door installed at my own house and had a hard time with the two pin and epoxy installation. Been a year and no problems.

I do think of Alfred H and Janet L whenever around showers 'tho.

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Ben you're saying that the glass flexed three inches ?!

I've been seeing these frameless showers for years, and they are always a heavy thickness of glass.

Yeah, this is her. Didn't measure it but I'd guess it was 3/8 thick. The door was hinged off the wall. The side that it "latches" on would move a lot.

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OK, you're talking about loose hinges or hardware, or otherwise inadequately secured components. That's a problem. If the door sags, it can hit the adjacent panel or tile. Tempered glass impacting other pieces of tempered material can "explode", similar to if you set a large tempered panel down on concrete or similar hard surface.

Few contractors put the necessary blocking in the wall. Some of these are only secured with drywall type anchors. That's bad.

I used to question these things when I first saw them. I've seen dozens or hundreds by now. If they're secure, they're OK imho.

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I know. I see them like that all the time. How is it different than commercial doors or anything else that is similar? Go to an Apple Store. They're nothing but huge glass panels hung into space with a million people bumping into them.

The first time I saw this kind of shower door, I didn't like it. I've googled the heck out of it for a couple years, and I can't find anything that says it's dangerous or wrong.

Maybe I'm wrong. I don't know.

Maybe I'm just tired of worrying about every permutation of possible danger.

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That's nice hardware. I've never seen it in any shower.

The installation guidelines are good, but they don't make any reference to safety. It's all the usual stuff.

Curious....

If shower glass is now a major safety concern, why don't we write up all shower doors, including those ubiquitous 3/16" cheap sliding shower doors?

Those seem a heck of a lot more fragile than 3/8" or 1/2" material.

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Maybe I'm just tired of worrying about every permutation of possible danger.

Amen!!

We really do have a nanny society when folks are so dependent on others to tell them about common sense problems!

I agree. I have often taken flak for voicing my opinion regarding "saving the world". There are many inspectors that try to do just that, Usually the new ones. oh ya, my opinion is we can't save the world or report everything. Manage expectations.

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The hazard may not be the panels but the soap and water. No soap, No water means less slippage. Is this a good recommendation???? "It is recommended to not use soap or water in the shower enclosure."

The panels are there to retain the water, not a couples mombo session are they?? Glass can be broken and that would be a hazard, so the fact that there is glass panels then there is a safety issue to write up also.

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The hazard may not be the panels but the soap and water. No soap, No water means less slippage. Is this a good recommendation???? "It is recommended to not use soap or water in the shower enclosure."

The panels are there to retain the water, not a couples mombo session are they?? Glass can be broken and that would be a hazard, so the fact that there is glass panels then there is a safety issue to write up also.

And if the shower wasn't bad enough, this house had stairs. STAIRS I TELL YOU! Who the hell would build such a house? Truly a fall waiting to happen. . .

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That's nice hardware. I've never seen it in any shower.

The installation guidelines are good, but they don't make any reference to safety. It's all the usual stuff.

Curious....

If shower glass is now a major safety concern, why don't we write up all shower doors, including those ubiquitous 3/16" cheap sliding shower doors?

Those seem a heck of a lot more fragile than 3/8" or 1/2" material.

I have not seen the hardware used either. I found similar hardware when I was investigating a complaint about movement in a big class panel. The owner did not seem to be worrying about safety, but the big wobbly panel bothered them.

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