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So on a more serious note than my last post..

Why is there no nationwide license,

I know most states will give you a license as long as you hold a license of similar requirements in another state. But why have the inspector exam mainly concentrating on a national portion when in my situation, we don't have basements so why ask about it (Texas)?

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Some professionals prefer as much local control and guidance over their licenses as possible. Others might even see our country as being comprised of 50 separate states who have constitutional authority to regulate intra-state affairs.

I'm personally glad that my home state is not (always) forced to comply with laws thought-up in other states. Some of them have volcanoes and hurricanes to contend with after all; we do not.

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I cannot think of one single professional license that applies nationwide.

The closest thing to a national license for me in architecture is that my NCARB certification facilitates reciprocal registration among most states, 11 Canadian jurisdictions, and can be used to support an application for registration in other countries.

Typically there is just some paperwork and a fee that goes to the jurisdiction. Like I said, everyone wants the $$.

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Nolan, I understand states not communicating. Being from Texas, we know most people here think we should be our own country ha

What Grant said. Home inspections are geographic specific, climate specific and are influenced by methods/materials common to the locality.

Marc

Im totally fine with being isolated to one state as my boundaries of work. What I don't understand is, or I think is dumb, is they know I'm going to be specific to one area then why test on the whole nation.

and steven, yeah money is always the median of everything governed, thats why I said they will give you a license in another state if you apply and are licensed in your home state. Well some will!

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Perhaps Scott will chime in later and confirm/deny, but I think the selections made by the NHIE from its master list are influenced by the geographic area and perhaps by the climate where the exam is given. At least it should.

Marc

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Perhaps Scott will chime in later and confirm/deny, but I think the selections made by the NHIE from its master list are influenced by the geographic area and perhaps by the climate where the exam is given. At least it should.

Marc

The location of the taker has no relation to the questions that are pulled from the "question" pool for the NHIE. This is what makes it a national exam and also what allows a person that has passed it to use the same exam to obtain a license in about 30 or so states across the country without retaking the exam. I have obtained a license in 4 states by just filling out the paperwork and paying the license fee. Sure some states have a few additional requirements, but most don't.

Some states do have specific "modules" that cover state specific requirements or items that the state wants to test on. Washington and Texas come to mind that have the additional module.

Illinois on the other hand did not listen to anyone at EBPHI and did not want a state specific module made by EBPHI, the state takes 25 questions out of the NHIE and then adds in 25 state made specific questions to the exam. This invalidated the exam from being used by other states because technically it is no longer the NHIE.. So folks that live on the boarders need to take both exams if they want a license in both states.

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There is no need for a National License. Most inspectors operate in a single state. Those that live near a state border might be licensed in both states. A few inspectors who do expert witness work that travel around the country might need multiple state licenses.

Only about 35 states license home inspectors. Some have reciprocity, some don't. If you move, take a 2 hr test, pay the $200 and go on your merry way.

Licensing is not the cure for bad home inspections. It sets a very minimum bar to weed out the very worst test takers. Licensing provides a specific path to take a home inspector to court. Licensing defines an SOP. It also sets up rules so the licensing board can reprimand inspectors that don't follow the SOP, basic report writing and basic business practices.

What would be the benefit of having a national license? How much money would you be willing to pay a year to maintain a national license? How many hours of ConEd would you be willing to take above and beyond your state required ConEd to maintain a national license? How many more customers would you get if you had a national license?

I work in an unlicensed state. Most consumers don't know that inspectors are not licensed. When I tell them they are horrified. Does having a marriage license make you a better spouse? Does a drivers license make you a better driver?

I worked in a licensed state for 7 years. Cost me about $750 a year for required classes and license fees. Since everyone had to be licensed to inspect, having a license did not provide any marketing value. National license would probably cost at least $500 a year between fees and continuing training. I don't think it would generate more than 1 or 2 inspections a year so it would be a zero sum certificate. Why bother.

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There's also the incredibly local nature of this thing we do. I couldn't competently inspect a property in Florida or Oregon, and there is no way in hell anyone not well versed in Chicago weirdness could inspect in my market.

Folks would get a lot of things right here and there, but none of it would have the necessary contextual balance that comes from knowing an area.

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