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Bagged/Plastic Wrapped Batt Questions


hausdok
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I observed the bagged or plastic wrapped type batt insulation (I think its marketed as an itch-proof product for do-it-yourselfers) in an attic today installed over the original 40+ year old fiberglass batt insulation with a Kraft vapor retarder (oriented properly).

I know that multiple vapor retarders are not recommended and it seems that this installation has actually create three.

I realize that some vapor from the home may find its way up and get trapped in the original insulation. This will probably affect its thermal resistance value, but what is the worse case scenario here. Has any one seen water logged insulation and other related damage in this type of installation?

What should I recommend to my client?

That they remove the fancy new insulation and discard it? That the remove it and slit both sides of the plastic to prevent moisture from being trapped below?

Anyone - what would you do/say?

Thanks.

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Bill,

I visited the J.M. site and I interpreted the information posted there as the sleeve did serve as a vapor retarder. I'll need to revisit that site and check out the O.C. site. Thanks for the product info. Not much useful information out there with simple google of "encapsulated insulation".

Dave Tontarski

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Thanks again for pointing me in the right direction on the Miraflex...here's some info. found on the internet. I'm posting this for the benefit of anyone following this thread looking for the same basic info. I was looking for.

Imagine loading all the fiberglass insulation you would need to insulate a medium-sized house into a station wagon or minivan. Owens-Corning's new PinkPlus insulation comes in a roll half the size of a comparable product, making it easier to handle and less expensive to transport.

These compact rolls are one benefit of the new Miraflex glass fiber. Miraflex is two forms of glass fused into a single twisted filament. The twists hold the fibers together, so chemical binders aren't needed. Owens-Corning even removed the coloring and other chemical additives, which is good news for people concerned about the health effects of fiberglass. Miraflex fibers themselves may reduce health concerns, too. The fiber is much softer and less irritating than original fiberglass insulation. Pink Plus rolls include a perforated pink plastic wrap. The wrap reduces itch-producing dust and helps the insulation slide into place. However, because it's perforated it doesn't create a vapor retarder as brown kraft paper facing does.

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I also found this...

"Miraflex insulation maintains its insulating power over time, will not settle or deteriorate with age and is non-combustible. The new product is also enclosed on three sides with a poly wrap, allowing the insulation to resist the collection of moisture within the wrap. The remaining side uses a standard poly-faced vapor retarder with stapling flanges."

From what I can find OC introduced Miraflex in 1994. If you go to their main site there is no mention of any plastic encapsulated batt insulation in their product lists. Anyone know why they discontinued it (assuming they did)? Was there a problem? Even with perforations it still seems like it would tend to trap some moisture in the insulation below, at least more so than unfaced batts or loose-blown.

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Hi Richard,

I've been seeing the sheath encapsulated stuff for about 10 years now and have never found it holding any moisture, regardless of brand used. Whatever the stuff is that they cover it with, it's able to release vapor and that's always a good thing.

OT - OF!!!

M.

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I insulated the floor of my old mobile home with that stuff about 12 years ago (OC). It was great about not getting all over me so bad, and sliding over the steel beams and pipes (me, myself, and I were on the job). I've pulled pieces back at least half a dozen times since for plumbing and other reasons...nothing wrong anywhere.

Brian G.

Not Itching To Do Another Job Like That [:-crazy]

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Take a look at the URL below for an updated "blowing fiberglass" insulation. I've heard and seen great things about it.

Having an R19 level added to my attic next week of this product.

Had a busy winter: Replaced my old/broken A/C ducts with new ducts rated at R8 and have also just finished putting in Polar-Ply radiant barrier. Now that I'm done "tromping" around in my attic I can refill what I've flattened.

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  • 5 years later...

02/26/13 I insulated my downstairs ceiling with this plastic bag insulation that has pink plastic and a white cotton filled insulation which was held in place by bending wires in between the joists (this is in a drop ceiling. I am replacing a section of the dropped ceiling with drywaill and want to know if this insulation is still used, is it recalled and is it safe around recessed lights. I bought it as a a safe way of not inhaling fiberglass, but can't find it at Home Depot anymore.

Larry

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I still see it all the time.

Building Supply stores won't stock stuff that won't sell. Perhaps builders in your region snubbed the stuff so your supplier stopped stocking it.

I wouldn't worry about inhaling fiberglass. ASHRAE conducted an extensive study years ago and couldn't find any evidence directly connecting fiberglass to illnesses in people.

The only place in the country fiberglass will give you cancer is in California - at least that's what the labels on the stuff say. Leave it to folks down in la-la land to come up with yet another whacko idea.

Men are from Mars, women are from Venus and everyone in California is from Uranus.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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02/26/13 I insulated my downstairs ceiling with this plastic bag insulation that has pink plastic and a white cotton filled insulation which was held in place by bending wires in between the joists (this is in a drop ceiling. I am replacing a section of the dropped ceiling with drywaill and want to know if this insulation is still used, is it recalled and is it safe around recessed lights. I bought it as a a safe way of not inhaling fiberglass, but can't find it at Home Depot anymore.

Larry

It's fiberglass insulation called Miraflex. You can't find it because Owens Corning stopped manufacturing it in 2003. There is no "recall". It just wasn't a great-selling product.

The type of recessed light housing will determine the needed clearance to insulation. You'll want to install IC rated fixtures.

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