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larster70
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Originally posted by Jim Katen

Originally posted by larster70

what's a good magnification to have?

20 x 125 is good. Nitrogen filled is a bonus.

I think you need this set.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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It's just for checking on flashing and other things that if further away on a roofs that are to steep to walk on or roofs that I may find unsafe to walk on 'that's all'.

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Originally posted by randynavarro

Whenever I have to use them, I use 10X. Seems okay but quality is what matters. The clearer and lighter the lens, the better. IOW the cheaper models are 'dark' when viewing thru the lenses.

If I had to do it again, I would buy a high quality 10x instead of a cheaper 12x or higher.

Are there any brands to stay away from or brands that are better than others?

I was think of these: Celestron 12x50 UpClose Wide Angle Porro Prism Binocular-71138 with 5.2-Degree Angle of View:

The UpClose Series from Celestron is a complete line of compact and full size binoculars at very economical prices. Celestron 12 X50 UpClose Binocular is rubber covered to protect against rough handling. 12x50mm Up Close Binocular is fully coated to give high contrast views.

Celestron 12X 50 UpClose Binocular #71138 belongs to Porro Prism Series and therefore has fully coated optics and diopter adjustment for fine focusing.

Celestron UpClose Series has something for everyone whether for action sports, vacationing, nature viewing, wildlife observing or various other activities.

Specifications for Celestron UpClose 12x50 mm Binoculars:

Prism Type: Porro

Magnification: 12x

Objective Diameter: 50mm

Angle of View: 5.2°

Field-of-View (@ 1000 Yds): 273' (91 m at 1000 m)

Minimum Focus Distance: 24.0' (7.3 m)

Exit Pupil Diameter: 4.2mm

Eye Relief: 12mm

Relative Brightness: 17.4

Twilight Factor: 24.5

Focus Type: Center

Weatherproofing: Water resistant

Tripod Socket: Yes

Dimensions (WxHxD): 4.8 x 4.1 x 2.1" (122 x 104 x 54mm)

Weight: 1.75 lb (795 g)

Features of Celestron UpClose 12 x 50 mm Binoculars:

* Fully coated lenses

* Bk7 Porro prisms

* Peel-down eyecups

* Dioptric correction

* Tripod adaptable

* Limited Lifetime Warranty

Here's a link: http://www.opticsplanet.net/celestron-u ... ulars.html

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Originally posted by larster70

Are there any brands to stay away from or brands that are better than others?

I was think of these: Celestron 12x50 UpClose Wide Angle Porro Prism Binocular-71138 with 5.2-Degree Angle of View:

I know more about cameras than binoculars, but I figure optics is optics, so:

12x binoculars are going to be hard to hold steady enough to concentrate on what you're viewing without either a tripod or image stabilization. I recommend you stick to 10x or smaller.

Big binoculars are a pain. They're clunky, hard to hold still, hard to store and hard to lug around. Unless you're planning on using them at dawn or dusk or at night, you probably don't need an objective anywhere near 50mm.

Beware of very cheap binoculars - they're usually more expensive in the long run. ($35 is very cheap.)

Coated optics are a good thing. Multi-coated optics are better. The image will be clearer and sharperlooking. If the sun is shining toward you, the multi-coating will really help to reduce flare much better than single coatings. If you plan to use these things when the sun is anywhere other than over your shoulder, look for optics that are fully multi-coated. Expect to pay for this.

Though I'm generally a fan of Pentax glass, I like my little Nikon Travelite III, 9x25. Great optics, small size and very durable.

You might also consider a monocular.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by Jim Katen

Originally posted by larster70

Are there any brands to stay away from or brands that are better than others?

I was think of these: Celestron 12x50 UpClose Wide Angle Porro Prism Binocular-71138 with 5.2-Degree Angle of View:

I know more about cameras than binoculars, but I figure optics is optics, so:

12x binoculars are going to be hard to hold steady enough to concentrate on what you're viewing without either a tripod or image stabilization. I recommend you stick to 10x or smaller.

Big binoculars are a pain. They're clunky, hard to hold still, hard to store and hard to lug around. Unless you're planning on using them at dawn or dusk or at night, you probably don't need an objective anywhere near 50mm.

Beware of very cheap binoculars - they're usually more expensive in the long run. ($35 is very cheap.)

Coated optics are a good thing. Multi-coated optics are better. The image will be clearer and sharperlooking. If the sun is shining toward you, the multi-coating will really help to reduce flare much better than single coatings. If you plan to use these things when the sun is anywhere other than over your shoulder, look for optics that are fully multi-coated. Expect to pay for this.

Though I'm generally a fan of Pentax glass, I like my little Nikon Travelite III, 9x25. Great optics, small size and very durable.

You might also consider a monocular.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

I'm finding that there's a ton of brands and they all seem to offer multi-coating on the lens. Is there a difference between brands when it comes to coatings, and what's with the nitrogen filled 'for fogging'?

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Ok, how about this set: http://www.binoculars.com/products/bush ... 25781.html

Do you guys/gals think the X27 is not wide enough?

maybe this one:http://www.binoculars.com/products/bushnell-8x32-excursion-waterprooffogproof-44038.html

and these:

http://www.binoculars.com/products/bush ... 4130.html#

which one would be best choice? Thanks for your time.

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Originally posted by larster70

which one would be best choice? Thanks for your time.

Given what you're going to do with them, I doubt that you'll need waterproof or nitrogen-purged binoculars.

There's no way to judge these things over the net. You should go to a place where you can touch them and look through them.

I'd suggest that you consider small size (roof prism) and physical comfort; what works for me might not work for you.

Also, as a new inspector, I hope you're obsessing about other, more important, aspects of your business as much as you're obsessing about binoculars.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by Jim Katen

Originally posted by larster70

which one would be best choice? Thanks for your time.

Given what you're going to do with them, I doubt that you'll need waterproof or nitrogen-purged binoculars.

There's no way to judge these things over the net. You should go to a place where you can touch them and look through them.

I'd suggest that you consider small size (roof prism) and physical comfort; what works for me might not work for you.

Also, as a new inspector, I hope you're obsessing about other, more important, aspects of your business as much as you're obsessing about binoculars.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

I hear you. It's just that I used a very old pair of Bushnell sportview 7X35 that I dug out from my basement and found them to be abit blurry. Today I went out to Dick's Sporting Goods and they only had a very limited selection. Anyways, the pair that I really liked was the nikon monarch atb pair, but they were around $300. I got home and looked at the Bushnell that I had and realized that the lens were just alittle dirty, so I cleaned then off. I tried them again and I finally mess with the right eye dial thing and I guess the combo of the two things help with the blurriness and sharpness 'stupid me'. I'm going to keep using this old pair for now.

Thanks

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Larry you will not be using those things as much as you think.

As has been suggested on this forum in the past,you are better off getting a good telescopic lens for the camera.

Remember you can only see one side of any projection thru the roof from the ground unless your eyeball can pop thru the lens as in a cartoon.[:-magnify

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Originally posted by chicago

Larry you will not be using those things as much as you think.

As has been suggested on this forum in the past,you are better off getting a good telescopic lens for the camera.

Remember you can only see one side of any projection thru the roof from the ground unless your eyeball can pop thru the lens as in a cartoon.[:-magnify

I only have compact digi and can not afford a digi slr camera at this time. ? do you guys or can you ride off your tool purchases from your taxes?

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Originally posted by larster70

. . . I only have compact digi and can not afford a digi slr camera at this time. ? do you guys or can you ride off your tool purchases from your taxes?

You don't need a digital SLR for this job. Any decent point & shoot is fine. An SLR is too expensive, too bulky and too fussy. It'd be more of a distraction than anything else.

As far as I know, inspection tools are deductible. But don't go by what I say, ask your accountant.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Too much obsessing on tools, and not enough on the job.

My job binoculars are a broken pair of Minolta Mini's; I can only focus one side (left); it's really more of a mildly bulky monocular, but it's fine.

Get a cheap camera; anything is fine for this job. The only things that would be really nice don't come on point & shoot's anyway, so don't worry about it. The choice is.... go w/the 10x optical zoom, or suffice <10x optical & go really tiny. Once you make that choice, the options become very obvious.

Basically, Panasonic w/the 10x, or Canon teeny tiny. That, of course, could change tomorrow, so that's why it's a good idea to just get a camera & learn how to integrate it into the inspection process; that's the tricky part, not which camera, because they're almost all identical.

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I have a pair of these 10X image stabilization binoculars, purchased used on Amazon for $250:

http://tinyurl.com/38o5z8

excellent for a general survey of the roof surface and flashings, chimneys, soffits and fascia, and second and third floor windows and wall surfaces before I get up on the ladder. They also often allow me to read the markings on newer service drops from ground level.

IMO the IS is equivalent to a gain of 50% or more in magnification - you can see as much detail with the 10X IS as with a 15X non IS pair, and the IS unit is a *lot* more pleasant to use in difficult situations, for example one-handed.

Now, if they would just build in a 3MP camera....

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That would be the ticket; a cheap little camera piggybacked onto a moderate pair of binoculars, or a monocular. I don't think it even has to be 3MP; heck, I started w/a 1.5MP camera for HI work, and it was fine.

We're not trying to capture the decisive moment or portray atmosphere in sublime commentary, we're just trying to document simple basic stuff. If it's in focus, it's probably completely adequate for HI work.

Check these out.....

http://www.opticsplanet.net/digital-cam ... ulars.html

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