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What problems do you see with brick veneer?


chicago
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The problem I have is how do you confirm some of these problems such as inadequate brick tie support?.Inadequate space behind the brick.?As far as inadequate pitch, is this something I should know or is it done by an architect?I usualy just check for flashing and weep holes.

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Originally posted by chicago

The problem I have is how do you confirm some of these problems such as inadequate brick tie support?

You can wander the construction sites once a month and take pictures. I did that for years.

Inadequate space behind the brick.?

Sometimes you can see it through foundation vents or at corners.

As far as inadequate pitch, is this something I should know or is it done by an architect?I usualy just check for flashing and weep holes.

The top of rowlocks should be pitched at least 15 degrees to shed water properly. It's an easy thing to check.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by Brandon Whitmore

Correct me if I am wrong, but doesn't the IRC allow the installation of brick veneer without weep holes and flashing above / below windows if there is a nailing flange at the windows (with a WRB)? I have had some trouble deciphering this requirement.

No, it does not. Check out R703.8. It's very clear.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by Brandon Whitmore

I did not check this requirement prior to posting this either, but I read that it is allowable to fill the required air space with mortar instead of leaving an air space. (pretty tough to evalute during inspection for me).

Yes. That's true. In fact, the older versions of the code used to list that as the primary method of installing brick veneer (slush the 1" space full of mortar). The 1" air space was an alternate method. Now the requirements are reversed.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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R703.8- Approved corrosion resistant flashings shall be installed at all of the following locations:

1)At top of all exterior windowsand door openings in such a manner as to be leak proof, except that self- flashing windows having a continuous lap of no less than 1 1/8" over the sheathing material around the perimeter of the opening, including corners, do not require additional flashing; jamb flashing may also be omittedwhen specifically approved by the building official.

Can someone explain to me what they are considering self flashing windows. I am reading this to say that they are considering the nailing flange as a self flashing window.

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Yes,

I think that is exactly what they are referring to and a whole lot of builders are rueing the day that they ever allowed that little ditty to find it's way into the codes because they're now paying for wet walls.

There's code and then there's the common-sense test. If it fails the common-sense test but is code, I think we've got a duty to tell our clients that, lest we become the target of a lawsuit. They can't sue the code guru, but they can sue you.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Originally posted by SonOfSwamp

Originally posted by chicago

The problem I have is how do you confirm some of these problems such as inadequate brick tie support?.Inadequate space behind the brick.?As far as inadequate pitch, is this something I should know or is it done by an architect?I usualy just check for flashing and weep holes.

Hard or impossible to check this stuff during a regular HI job.

Most of our investigations were destructive. We hired guys to open up walls, then close them. 100% of Nashville-area houses have bad brick veneer.

Anyhow... as brother Katen says, you can see the "air space" full of mud during construction. Same with brick ties, and even flashings.

Fun fact: Ridgid has just put on the market a poor man's borescope, the "See Snake." For about $200, you can have a tool that'll look into walls through a small hole. Fiber optic probe, color display, and all that. Next time I have to look into a brick wall, I'll have myself a See Snake.

Hint: Cut or drill the hole in the garage wall, for easy patching after you "probe" the wall.

You can easily eyeball the less-than-15-degree pitch on the exterior window stools. Or, if you want to prove pitch on the spot, you can do it with a five-dollar protractor. I bought mine at Home Depot.

WJ

I want one! http://www.ridgid.com/Tools/SeeSnake-micro

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Originally posted by Brandon Whitmore

. . . Can someone explain to me what they are considering self flashing windows. I am reading this to say that they are considering the nailing flange as a self flashing window.

The term "self-flashing window" appears in the code but not in any window manufacturer's literature. If you call a manufacturer and ask them about self-flashing windows, they'll deny that they make such an animal.

Enough people have asked the ICC about this that the term has been struck from the code. In the 2006 edition, there's no mention of self-flashing windows in 703.8.

-Jim Katen, Oregon

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