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ssully757
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I need help. I'm moving into my Grandma's house which was built in the 50s. The problem is that she has a floor furnace and my girlfriend has two small kids. Does anyone know of anything i can use to prevent any injuries to the kids feet or if that is even an issue. I'm kinda unsure if it gets hot too the touch.

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Originally posted by ssully757

I need help. I'm moving into my Grandma's house which was built in the 50s. The problem is that she has a floor furnace and my girlfriend has two small kids. Does anyone know of anything i can use to prevent any injuries to the kids feet or if that is even an issue. I'm kinda unsure if it gets hot too the touch.

Each kid will only burn himself on it once. Kids learn fast. Then they'll experiment with dropping small plastic toys down there. The fun never ends.

BTW, if it's an old floor furnace, have a heating tech come out and give it a good going over. Then install a carbon monoxide alarm in the house.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by Jim Katen

Then install a carbon monoxide alarm in the house.

And don't just grab the first one you find. Read the labels or check their specs out online. You want the lowest alarm level you can get. Kids and grandmothers cannot handle the same levels as a normal adult, which many alarms will not account for. Most are still set to alarm at 70 PPM (parts per million). Don't settle for less than 30 PPM, but the best are at 10 PPM. Google "CO Experts model 2004".

Brian G.

Silent, Tasteless, Odorless, and Deadly [:-wiltel]

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The most stupid thing I ever did in my life was break the grill on our floor furnace when my son was only two years old. I was so dumb (22 years old) that I did not place any emphasis on blocking it off or getting the grill replaced quickly. You guessed it my son fell on to the hot heat exchanger and cooked his little behind. I can still remember the pain that little guy suffered when I held him down and his mother poured mecurachome daily on the wound to stop the infection as per our doctors orders. He is 49 years old now and has an awful scar remaining on his left buttock. After all these years I am still haunted because of my stupidity for letting such a preventable thing happen.

If this post saves one child from what I did in ignorance maybe I can feel better.

Regards,

Paul B.

Lawrenceville, Ga.

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Like Brian said, don't buy the first CO detector you find. Also, don't price-shop! Some units are much more likely to give false alarms than others, and have shorter lifespans. I don't know if I'm allowed to shoot down, or plug, specific brands here, so...

There's one brand that every big box store has tons of. It rhymes with "Worst Alert." It's very inexpensive - often less than $20. Not as dependable as one might like.

The CO detectors in my house usually sell for $40 - $50. Worth every penny. False alarms on that brand are very, very rare. Rhymes with "RightHawk" or "Pidde."

Replace your batteries twice a year. Replace your detectors every five years.

Like Paul said, if this post saves one person from mistakes that I've seen, I'll be a very happy man.

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Hi,

You needn't have put yourself through that. There's nothing wrong with stating your opinion plainly. You aren't disparaging anyone and, unless you work for them, there's no prohibition against recommending a company's product when you feel it is better than another company's product.

OT - OF!!!

M.

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Thanks, Mike. I guess it's no different from talking about ladders or moisture meters.

First Alert CO detectors are a waste of money. NightHawk makes very dependable detectors. Recently Kidde bought NightHawk. So Kidde now puts the good technology in their own packaging.

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