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Dormer step flashing


Tim Maxwell
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If the flashing extends up above the siding adequately, I'm not sure there is a maximum siding reveal, is there?

I think this is more embarassingly ugly than a leak hazard, although a high wind driven rain could drive up the steps, I suppose.

Sheesh, what sort of tradesman could walk away from that steaming turd?

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Sheesh, what sort of tradesman could walk away from that steaming turd?

It's a true craftsman that can calculate the diminishing line effect to make the reveal look even from the ground.

No one criticized the Greeks for putting bulges in their columns to combat the optical illusion of a waist line.

I think we all need to step back a bit and relax; stop jumping to critical conclusions and give builders the benefit of the doubt sometimes.

OK, I'm over that compassionate phase now. Steaming turd is euphemism.

Still, I'd bet money it's fully functional and is way better than having the siding touching the roof.

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On pressed board or wood siding there should be at least a 2" exposure above roof line because of moisture contact and decay. Down in my neck of the woods we are lucky to see any exposure at all much less a crooked one. We just see moisture damaged siding at roof contact.

Sometimes I think builders and tradesmen just don't care, other times I know for sure they don't.

Paul B.

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This I can tell you.

Research done by the Northwest Wall and Ceiling Bureau has determined that wind-driven rain can be pushed 3-4 inches up behind siding during severe storms, so you'd want to ensure that there's at least a 3-4 inch overlap onto that flashing. If the long leg is only 5 inches and you leave a 3" flashing reveal, you've now created a situation where there's only 2-inches of flashing behind the siding.

OT - OF!!!

M.

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I agree with Paul that if it is wood siding the standoff is preferred. My first property I looked at had wood siding that butt right up to the shingles and there was a ton of rot in the ends of the siding. The standoff is not the best looking approach but it provides longevity to wood siding. Sealing the end grains is another thing that should be done.

With vinyl siding standoff wouldn't matter since the vinyl will not rot. In this case no standoff gives the best aesthetic appeal.

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With vinyl siding standoff wouldn't matter since the vinyl will not rot. In this case no standoff gives the best aesthetic appeal.

It matters. Depending on which vinyl manufacturers instructions you read, anywhere from an inch to 2 inches clearance to the roof is required. I've never read instructions that advocate having the vinyl resting directly on the roof surface. Vinyl may not rot but it will deform from high heat.

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My experience is similar to Paul's also. The knotheads around here just love to push it right down on the shingles, no matter what the material.

Having said that, the reveal at the high end is pretty big. Something tells me the diminishing line effect was not a primary consideration for the fellows who did the work. [;)]

Love the suggestion though....gotta remember that one.

Brian G.

Diminishing Talent Pool is More Likely [:-yuck]

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Research done by the Northwest Wall and Ceiling Bureau has determined that wind-driven rain can be pushed 3-4 inches up behind siding during severe storms, so you'd want to ensure that there's at least a 3-4 inch overlap onto that flashing. If the long leg is only 5 inches and you leave a 3" flashing reveal, you've now created a situation where there's only 2-inches of flashing behind the siding.

I am pretty happy when I see a 1 or 2" overlap between the siding and step flashing. I don't see how the installation in that picture would be better off with less flashing exposure. I would think that the water would be forced up the several inches measured from the horizontal roof to vertical wall junction, not from where the bottom edge of the siding stops. Not saying it is a good installation or anything.

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