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North American Recalls Counterfeit Breakers


hausdok
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Washington, D.C./December 27, 2007 - Release #08-151

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in cooperation with North American Breaker Co. Inc. (NABCO), of Burbank, Calif. , today announced a voluntary recall of approximately 50,000 circuit breakers labeled as "Square D" that are counterfeit and could fail to trip when they are required to, posing a fire hazard to consumers.

20071030202457_SquareDrecall.jpgThe counterfeit circuit breakers are black, were made in china, and are marked as Square D products. They were sold through electrical distributors, and retailers nationwide from March 2003 through April 2006 for between $3 and $85.

The counterfeit circuit breakers are black and are labeled as Square D QO-series models 110, 115, 120, 130, 210, 215, 220, 225,230, 235, 240, 250, 260, 280, 1515, 1520, 2020, 2125, 315, 340, 350,360, and 3100.

Actual Square D circuit breakers have (a) the amp rating written on the handle in white paint on the front of the breaker; (b) the Square D insignia molded onto the breaker side, and; © a yellow chromate mounting clip with half of the top of the clip visible. If your Square D breaker does not match this description, it could be counterfeit.

Inspectors finding these breakers should advise homeowners to contact NABCO to determine if the breaker they have is counterfeit and to arrange for a free inspection and replacement or refund if necessary.

For more information, contact NABCO at (866)505-5851 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. PT, email the firm at recall@nabreaker.com, or visit the firm's Web site at www.nabcorecall.com - this is not a Square D Company recall.

To see this recall on CPSC's web site, including pictures of the recalled product, please click here.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of serious injury or death from more than 15,000 types of consumer products under the agency's jurisdiction. Deaths, injuries and property damage from consumer product incidents cost the nation more than $700 billion annually. The CPSC is committed to protecting consumers and families from products that pose a fire, electrical, chemical, or mechanical hazard or can injure children. The CPSC's work to ensure the safety of consumer products - such as toys, cribs, power tools, cigarette lighters, and household chemicals - contributed significantly to the 30 percent decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 30 years.

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Kurt,

Just curious, and not to change the subject but if you kept a client mailing list, you could use this as a marketing opportunity. Send a letter to them about this and what to look for. You could also put in a statement that you will swing by and check if they are uncertain or to call NABCO if they are uncertain. I guess the curious part is, do you think this is ethical, I don't see any problems with it now. But when that person that you notified and had the problem corrected is asked by a friend for an HI, I bet your name will flow right out..

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I regularly send out emails to past clients with safety or maintenance tips in a newsletter format. I get several responses saying thank you and nobody that I can remember has responded negatively. Of course, I only send something out once a quarter. I have gotten calls from folks saying they got my contact info off of the newsletter. Works for me.

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Those Chinese, always good for a laugh... a few years back I had a sump pump failure because the "stainless steel" band clamp I purchased at Home Depot turned out to be mild steel, and rusted out in about 6 mos - no doubt someone in China made $.002 extra each on about 15 million of them, and retired rich by Chinese standards.

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Huh?

You make is sound like the Chinese hold the franchise on making poor products? Don't get me started on the number of things that I've seen made lousy in this country in my lifetime. It doesn't matter what nationality they are, manufacturers everywhere will always take shortcuts and get caught at it sooner or later.

OT - OF!!!

M.

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