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Stapleton Ladders


Erol Kartal
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I have been using the 12' 6" telescoping ladder for about 6 or 7 years. I have replaced the feet several times and worn out the packing in the sections that keeps it from pulling apart, but it still works and I wouldn't be without it.

It gets me on 95% of one-story roofs and into almost any attic hatch. Just extend it to about 18" longer the the ceiling height, push open the hatch with the ladder top, rest it on the side of the framing and climb up and in. No hoisting myself up from the top of a step ladder...

The telescoping ladder is also a great "gee-whiz" tools for clients. They're always amazed.

My other ladders are a 5' step ladder for high ceilngs and a 24' extension ladder for two-story roofs. Anything less won't get you on two-story roofs around here.

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I can't imagine using my outdoor ladder for indoor tasks in a house I'm inspecting. Maybe it's due to our differing climates, but the feet of my outdoor ladder are in a constant state of repellant filth. If I were to bring that ladder indoor and place in on a white carpet, it would leave indelible marks and I'd be chased out of the house within minutes.

How do you guys with LG & Telesteps ladders deal with this? Or do you not have mud in Austin?

- Jim Katen, Oregon (As the Inuits have 20 words for "snow," Oregonians have roughly the same number for "mud.")

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Originally posted by Jim Katen

I can't imagine using my outdoor ladder for indoor tasks in a house I'm inspecting. Maybe it's due to our differing climates, but the feet of my outdoor ladder are in a constant state of repellant filth. If I were to bring that ladder indoor and place in on a white carpet, it would leave indelible marks and I'd be chased out of the house within minutes.

How do you guys with LG & Telesteps ladders deal with this? Or do you not have mud in Austin?

- Jim Katen, Oregon (As the Inuits have 20 words for "snow," Oregonians have roughly the same number for "mud.")

Jim,

I generally can place the outdoor ladder on a driveway or sidewalk, or sometimes in grass. The attic access is usually in a garage or bedroom closet. In any case, I haven't had a problem with tracking in mud on the feet, and if there is mud on them it is easily cleaned off.

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Originally posted by Jim Katen

I can't imagine using my outdoor ladder for indoor tasks in a house I'm inspecting. Maybe it's due to our differing climates, but the feet of my outdoor ladder are in a constant state of repellant filth. If I were to bring that ladder indoor and place in on a white carpet, it would leave indelible marks and I'd be chased out of the house within minutes.

How do you guys with LG & Telesteps ladders deal with this? Or do you not have mud in Austin?

- Jim Katen, Oregon (As the Inuits have 20 words for "snow," Oregonians have roughly the same number for "mud.")

I have a couple of carpet sample squares that I put my LG ladder on if I need to use it inside of a house, I also have an old bed sheet that I put down if needed. Hint: Do not use the carpet squares on wood or tile floors!.

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I just ordered one too, the Extend & Climb. I hate trying to stick a regular ladder in an attic scuttle hole. I paid $192, shipping included...not bad at all.

Like Paul I have a 5 foot stepladder and an extension ladder. I also have an articulating ladder left from my burglar bar installation days. It's a little awkward, but sometimes it can get you there when the situation is weird.

Brian G.

Articulating Telescopic Inspector [:-masked]

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My ladder arrived late this afternoon. Seems like a nice piece of work. My 5 year old loves it...So cool! Boys and their toys...

Thanks to Chris for the heads-up.

Brian G.

Now I Have 2 Things That Seem to Extend Forever [:-dev3] [:-eyebrows]

(Actually the other is my mortgage.) [:-headache]

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  • 2 weeks later...

I used my ladder today for the very thing I most wanted it for, a scuttle hole access to an attic in a small, crowded room. I seem to get this at least a time or two per month here and it's a pain with normal ladders. Very easy with the telescopic, good "Gee Whiz" value to boot. Money well spent for me.

Now if Kurt will just hurry up and get the Monkey Cam out of testing.....

Brian G. [:-bonc01]

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  • 1 month later...

PLEASE, be careful! There is a commonly advertised telescoping ladder that IMO is terribly unsafe. I have a fellow inspector whose inspection career has been abruptly ended due to the collapse of one of these POS. Please research any ladder for its certified weight ratings by an accredited institution befoe purchasing.

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