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Apollo HydroHeat -- known problems?


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I live in a 20+ yr old condo that had an Apollo Hydro Heat system. I replaced the hot water heater 2 yrs ago with an identical (apparently discontinued) Apollo water heater. This past summer, I needed to replace the A/C and chose to also update the heating unit. I was sold a Kenmore compressor and air handler installed by Sears. (I think that's what I got--whatever costs about $8000.00) The system doesn't seem to be working properly. The installer has been wonderful and has tried troubleshooting but we're not sure what else could be the cause of all the inconsistent heating and water temp problems. Are other manufacturers compatible with Apollo? [:-weepn]

Yes, pretty much anything is compatible with any hydro-heat system.

Exactly what did you have installed? For $8K it must have been some pretty fancy stuff.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Yes, but it came from Sears so it's only $30 a month... for all eternity.

Tom

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LOL. I wish it was only 30.00 a month! The best deal I could get was deferred interest for one year! I got a Kenmore variable speed air handler 15 amps/type B model number FVM4X2400A; Kenmore condenser 30amps/type B, model number N4A424AKA; suction 5/8, liquid 5/16. Filter size 16x21x1. 14 Seer, 24,000 BTU. Needless to say, none of that means anything to me!! I was just hoping I was making a good investment and wouldn't have to deal with anything for awhile. $7258.00 grand total. I went with Sears assuming it was the way to go. After all, they're SEARS!! In my research prior to purchasing the unit, it's always been the subcontractors who have been bad-mouthed. But I have to say-if it wasn't for the sub-contractor that installed this unit--I would have probably gone after Sears! Air Connections has been Sears' only saving grace! Unfortunately, there have been multiple problems with the installation...too many to go into. But Sears customer service people are just the rudest people I have ever had the misfortune of dealing with! Anyhooooo, I guess it's back to the trouble-shooting drawing board....Any suggestions? [:-weepn]

Happy New Year!

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LOL. I wish it was only 30.00 a month! The best deal I could get was deferred interest for one year! I got a Kenmore variable speed air handler 15 amps/type B model number FVM4X2400A; Kenmore condenser 30amps/type B, model number N4A424AKA; suction 5/8, liquid 5/16. Filter size 16x21x1. 14 Seer, 24,000 BTU. Needless to say, none of that means anything to me!!

You have a variable speed air handler. That's nice because it starts & stops quietly, it's more efficient that the single speed or two-speed air handlers, and, if you run the fan all by itself, it'll be nice & quite.

You also have a 2-ton air conditioner that has a decent level of efficiency.

Both of those things can be made to work just fine with your Apollo water heater and its associated heating coil.

I was just hoping I was making a good investment and wouldn't have to deal with anything for awhile. $7258.00 grand total. I went with Sears assuming it was the way to go. After all, they're SEARS!!

Just so you know, none of that stuff is actually made by Sears. There's no such thing as an actual Kenmore brand. Sears has contracts with other manufacturers who make this stuff for them. In this case, your air handler and air conditioner are made by ICP (International Comfort Products), the same company that makes Tempstar & Heil. It's an OK company that makes middle-quality equipment. It's neither high end nor low end. The only difference between a Tempstar air conditioner and a Kenmore air conditioner is the label.

Likewise, the guy who installed your system doesn't actually work for Sears, they subcontract out all of their HVAC installation work. He's just the local HVAC contractor who won the bid to do installations for Sears. That doesn't mean that he's good or bad, but it does mean that he probably bid pretty low to get the contract.

In my research prior to purchasing the unit, it's always been the subcontractors who have been bad-mouthed. But I have to say-if it wasn't for the sub-contractor that installed this unit--I would have probably gone after Sears! Air Connections has been Sears' only saving grace! Unfortunately, there have been multiple problems with the installation...too many to go into. But Sears customer service people are just the rudest people I have ever had the misfortune of dealing with! Anyhooooo, I guess it's back to the trouble-shooting drawing board....Any suggestions? [:-weepn]. . .

What, exactly, is the problem with your system? What is it doing or not doing? Are your potable water temperatures not consistent or are the problems limited to your heating and cooling system?

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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LOL. I wish it was only 30.00 a month! The best deal I could get was deferred interest for one year! I got a Kenmore variable speed air handler 15 amps/type B model number FVM4X2400A; Kenmore condenser 30amps/type B, model number N4A424AKA; suction 5/8, liquid 5/16. Filter size 16x21x1. 14 Seer, 24,000 BTU. Needless to say, none of that means anything to me!!

You have a variable speed air handler. That's nice because it starts & stops quietly, it's more efficient that the single speed or two-speed air handlers, and, if you run the fan all by itself, it'll be nice & quite.

You also have a 2-ton air conditioner that has a decent level of efficiency.

Both of those things can be made to work just fine with your Apollo water heater and its associated heating coil.

I was just hoping I was making a good investment and wouldn't have to deal with anything for awhile. $7258.00 grand total. I went with Sears assuming it was the way to go. After all, they're SEARS!!

Just so you know, none of that stuff is actually made by Sears. There's no such thing as an actual Kenmore brand. Sears has contracts with other manufacturers who make this stuff for them. In this case, your air handler and air conditioner are made by ICP (International Comfort Products), the same company that makes Tempstar & Heil. It's an OK company that makes middle-quality equipment. It's neither high end nor low end. The only difference between a Tempstar air conditioner and a Kenmore air conditioner is the label.

Likewise, the guy who installed your system doesn't actually work for Sears, they subcontract out all of their HVAC installation work. He's just the local HVAC contractor who won the bid to do installations for Sears. That doesn't mean that he's good or bad, but it does mean that he probably bid pretty low to get the contract.

In my research prior to purchasing the unit, it's always been the subcontractors who have been bad-mouthed. But I have to say-if it wasn't for the sub-contractor that installed this unit--I would have probably gone after Sears! Air Connections has been Sears' only saving grace! Unfortunately, there have been multiple problems with the installation...too many to go into. But Sears customer service people are just the rudest people I have ever had the misfortune of dealing with! Anyhooooo, I guess it's back to the trouble-shooting drawing board....Any suggestions? [:-weepn]. . .

What, exactly, is the problem with your system? What is it doing or not doing? Are your potable water temperatures not consistent or are the problems limited to your heating and cooling system?

- Jim Katen, Oregon

I don't care what anyone else says . . . Jim Katen is a groovy kind of guy.

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Don't know where to begin. This was originally installed in May 2009. Since then, they have been here 10+ times. The a/c worked well during the summer. But in October when it started getting colder here in CT, I realized I had no heat. Apparently, there were several parts not installed for one reason or another. The electric boxes with red/green lights on them on the side of the unit that indicate the unit is calling for heat/cool were not installed initially...a pump was added to the pipes on the outside of the air handler to help circulate the water? Then a day later, there was flood in my basement (family room)due to a pipe leaking above the pump...allegedly due to the expanding and contracting or whatever. They paid to have the carpet cleaned and treated to prevent mold. That's when Sears first irked me...another long story. But I insisted that all electrical components that were exposed to the water (the spewing water was above the unit)...I paid for new--I wanted new. Not water-logged. Since then, they have changed the pump to another with a little more oomph in an effort to get the heat blowing better and bumped up the fan speed on 11/27. Now, all of a sudden, my hot water only gets to 100 degrees at the tap although hot water heater is set at 140. The heat is also inconsistent in the temp it blows. Assume that's secondary to the low water temp... For every 15 minute cycle, only 5 minutes is actually warm air blowing... The sub contractor has been very willing to persist in (and humbled by)getting this working as it should. I got Sears to extend my warranty an additional year beyond the one that comes with the unit to 11/27 (the day I thought we were finally done)...to 11/27/2011. However, as of yesterday, we're still trying to resolve all the issues. I have a certificate of insurance from the installer....I just don't know if the problem is in the installation or the unit itself at this point. He's going to have another guy come and take a look at it.....and the saga continues...[:-weepn]

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Don't know where to begin. This was originally installed in May 2009. Since then, they have been here 10+ times. The a/c worked well during the summer. But in October when it started getting colder here in CT, I realized I had no heat. Apparently, there were several parts not installed for one reason or another. The electric boxes with red/green lights on them on the side of the unit that indicate the unit is calling for heat/cool were not installed initially...a pump was added to the pipes on the outside of the air handler to help circulate the water? Then a day later, there was flood in my basement (family room)due to a pipe leaking above the pump...allegedly due to the expanding and contracting or whatever. They paid to have the carpet cleaned and treated to prevent mold. That's when Sears first irked me...another long story. But I insisted that all electrical components that were exposed to the water (the spewing water was above the unit)...I paid for new--I wanted new. Not water-logged.

From your description, it's pretty obvious that your installer didn't know what he was doing. He might not have ever worked on a hydroheat system before. I suspect that he's learning on your dime.

The interesting thing is that, even after all of his obvious screw-ups, you have only nice things to say about him because, I suppose, he's been such a gentleman and nice guy. I guess there's a lesson in there for those of us who occasionally have a customer with a complaint.

Since then, they have changed the pump to another with a little more oomph in an effort to get the heat blowing better and bumped up the fan speed on 11/27.

Oh, not a good idea. If anything, they should have tried slowing the fan speed. By bumping it, you're making the air at the registers cooler while, at the same time, sucking too much heat out of the storage tank too fast.

Now, all of a sudden, my hot water only gets to 100 degrees at the tap although hot water heater is set at 140. The heat is also inconsistent in the temp it blows. Assume that's secondary to the low water temp... For every 15 minute cycle, only 5 minutes is actually warm air blowing...

Yes. Too much air moving too quickly over the coil.

The sub contractor has been very willing to persist in (and humbled by)getting this working as it should. I got Sears to extend my warranty an additional year beyond the one that comes with the unit to 11/27 (the day I thought we were finally done)...to 11/27/2011. However, as of yesterday, we're still trying to resolve all the issues. I have a certificate of insurance from the installer....I just don't know if the problem is in the installation or the unit itself at this point. He's going to have another guy come and take a look at it.....and the saga continues...[:-weepn]

It's not the equipment, it's the installation. I think it's a good idea for him to bring in another tech -- hopefully, it will be a tech who knows how to set up a hydro air system. The trick is to match the fan speed to the pump speed so that you get air that's nice & warm, and not blowing through the ducts too quickly. Longer cycles are good; shorter cycles are bad.

How big is your condo? (in square feet)

Are there units adjacent to yours? Above? Below? Each side?

Did your Apollo system heat the condo ok before you got the new air handler?

On your water heater's data plate, how many BTU/hr does it say the unit will provide?

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Sounds like a typical Apollo to me. Blows barely warm air, cools down your hot water and is never sized properly for the home. My guess is you need a bigger and faster recovery water heater.

Not necessarily. These systems can be set up to deliver warm, comfortable air from a remarkably small water heater. They just have to be set up properly.

You've usually got 50 gallons of water at 140 degrees.

There's a tempering valve that chokes the temperature down to 120 degrees at the potable water fixtures in the kitchen & baths.

When the heating system is working, you don't want to use up the heat that's stored in the tank -- it's just a buffer. The water is just a transport vehicle for the heat. The heating system can only deliver heat at the rate that the water heater's burner can produce it -- usually in the 40k to 60k btu/hr range, which ought to be plenty for a small-to-medium sized condo.

So the flame produces, let's say, 40,000 btu of heat every hour. It transfers that heat to the water, and the water transfers the heat into the air. What's happening with Mary-Anne's system is that the installer is trying to suck too much heat out of the storage tank too fast. He's exceeding the capacity of the flame and as a result the reservoir is cooling down too quickly. He needs to balance the system so that the air handler can't suck heat out of the water faster than the flame can put it in.

If you do this right, and if the system is sized perfectly for the house, then on the coldest day of the year this system will run continuously, keeping the house at 68 degrees and never letting the water drop below 120 degrees.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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My confidence in the installer has certainly waned over the past 7 months. However, he knows that I know he's not terribly familiar with this system but has been making every effort to assure me that he will do whatever it takes until it's right. He seems just as frustrated as I am. I'm pretty sure he's embarassed, too. I guess we all have to learn someplace-unfortunately my downstairs has become the classroom!

My condo is 1280sq ft. 3 levels--only one zone. 2 BR and 2 baths upstairs, DR/LR, kitchen and lav on the main level and the family room/laundry room downstairs. I have a unit on either side of me.

The old Apollo system didn't heat very well--had and still has a hard time getting to the upstairs. That was one of the reasons I decided to replace it. It was probably as old as the condo. I have also covered the windows with plastic and added weather seal in an effort to keep some of the heat in the house!!

My hot water heater is 50 gal/48000 btu. And is also on the other side of the room from the air handler. Despite it being relatively new, as soon as I can afford to, I'd like to look into the Rinnai tankless water heaters. Would that be a solution? I am very grateful for your assistance with this. I'm about to lose my mind!!!

As an aside-I haven't yet signed that agreement with Sears that I'm content with things as they are...should I have asked for additional protection beyond what I asked for? I'm scared because of the amount this unit cost me and with the installation being done piece by piece...I have major anxiety that the integrity of the system is going to be or has been effected. If you'd like to-you can e-mail me directly at mimiac55@aol.com. I won't be on line again until later this evening or even tomorrow.

Thanks again, Jim! You really are one groovy guy!! LOL

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. . . My condo is 1280sq ft. 3 levels--only one zone. 2 BR and 2 baths upstairs, DR/LR, kitchen and lav on the main level and the family room/laundry room downstairs. I have a unit on either side of me.

That's a tough setup. I suspect that, without multiple zones, any HVAC system will not be able to produce even temperatures across all three floors.

The old Apollo system didn't heat very well--had and still has a hard time getting to the upstairs. That was one of the reasons I decided to replace it. It was probably as old as the condo. I have also covered the windows with plastic and added weather seal in an effort to keep some of the heat in the house!!

What have you got for insulation in the ceiling above the third floor?

My hot water heater is 50 gal/48000 btu. And is also on the other side of the room from the air handler.

There's really no reason why 48,000 btu/hr shouldn't be able to heat 1280 square feet of townhome with units on either side. Your system should work -- although without zones it will never work well.

Despite it being relatively new, as soon as I can afford to, I'd like to look into the Rinnai tankless water heaters. Would that be a solution?

It will add a whole new layer of complexity to the system. In general I really dislike those units. They use obscene amounts of gas, they're not particularly efficient, and they're very expensive.

As an aside-I haven't yet signed that agreement with Sears that I'm content with things as they are...should I have asked for additional protection beyond what I asked for?

Personally, I'd ask for the warranty clock to start ticking from the time that the system is working properly.

I'm scared because of the amount this unit cost me and with the installation being done piece by piece...I have major anxiety that the integrity of the system is going to be or has been effected.

I wouldn't worry about that so much. If you replaced the control boards after the flood, there's nothing much else that would have been damaged.

Wait to see what happens when the installer brings the new guy in. If they get it working properly and balance the system to give you enough heat upstairs, it should work fine. You will have to balance the system each spring and each fall when you switch between heating and cooling, but aside from that, this system ought to work well, once it's properly installed.

Also check your ceiling insulation. You might find that it's on the skimpy side.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Quick question. We have one of these in our 2BR apartment in Michigan with a programmable thermostat. We've noticed that it takes a long time to raise the temp -- maybe an hour to raise it two degrees -- and we just realized that its hydroheat and not a standard gas furnace. Should we be using this with a programmable thermostat? Obviously, the set-backs can't be as aggressive -- given how hard (and long) it has to work to raise temp -- and we haven't had a really bad cold spell yet. Or should we just keep it at a set temp all the time?

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I don't think it has anything to do with the stat and everything to do with the coil getting clogged/dirty. I once found one of these so clogged with crud that air was barely passing through the coil. I took a can of that compressed air for computers and blasted a path up through the crud and very warm air began coming out of the little aperature I'd created.

I suggest cleaning the coil before trying anything else.

OT - OF!!!

M.

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And check to make certain the water heater temperature isn't lower than the recommended setting for this use.

While 120 is recommended for safety, that won't cut it when the water heater is heating the home. You may need to jack it up and get scald guards for tubs and showers.

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And check to make certain the water heater temperature isn't lower than the recommended setting for this use.

While 120 is recommended for safety, that won't cut it when the water heater is heating the home. You may need to jack it up and get scald guards for tubs and showers.

I grew up on the Connecticut state line and lived in Connecticut for a few years in my 20's, so I know that it's pretty cold there this time of year. Buy a $7 meat thermometer, drain some water off the water heater into a bucket and test the water temp. Then go to the nearest fixture, fill the sink with hot water and test the temp. If the unit is set to 140° and producing 140° at the unit and you're getting 100° water, then you're losing 40° between the unit and the delivery point and I think that you'll need to figure out where that loss is occurring or you'll never get water that's hot enough or interior temps that are warm enough.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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And check to make certain the water heater temperature isn't lower than the recommended setting for this use.

While 120 is recommended for safety, that won't cut it when the water heater is heating the home. You may need to jack it up and get scald guards for tubs and showers.

A hydro heat system should be set at 140 degrees and there should be a tempering valve at the water heater that takes the domestic water down to 120 degrees (or whatever you find comfortable). The tempering valve should feed all kitchen & bath fixtures. The straight 140-degree water ONLY goes to the heating coil.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Quick question. We have one of these in our 2BR apartment in Michigan with a programmable thermostat. We've noticed that it takes a long time to raise the temp -- maybe an hour to raise it two degrees -- and we just realized that its hydroheat and not a standard gas furnace. Should we be using this with a programmable thermostat? Obviously, the set-backs can't be as aggressive -- given how hard (and long) it has to work to raise temp -- and we haven't had a really bad cold spell yet. Or should we just keep it at a set temp all the time?

OK, I won't post any more after this, I certainly don't want to offend 'Groovy' Jimmy, but I run into these systems maybe 2x a month. No matter what the water heater is set at or no matter how fast the recovery (Mary Annes water heater is way too slow at recovery) the system will not put out air hotter than 100 degrees F. A programmable thermostat will defeat the system. Think in-floor radiant heat. Set the temperature and leave it on or leave it off. Jim's assesment sounds like it is taken off the Apollo website. These systems are not efficient except in the sense that that they are cheap to run but leave you wishing for heat.

It will not heat the house in any hurry if it heats at all.

In and ideal world, they may be efficient. In the real world they suck. I advise you warn your clients. I have had more than one client let me know what they thought.

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"In and ideal world, they may be efficient. In the real world they suck. I advise you warn your clients. I have had more than one client let me know what they thought."

It seems every area is different, in terms of both system demands and clients. I see those systems about as often and, curiously, no one has ever called to express dismay regarding them - not in over 10,000 inspections. Of course no one has called to rave about them either. I don't reply to dispute anything and truly don't doubt anyone's experience posted here.

One curious thing I've heard and observed through traveling the country as a vendor at home inspection conventions and seminars: home buyer's expectations and willingness to be ugly appear to be markedly different by region. Thankfully, Richmond is an amazingly gracious town and people have always been pretty reasonable and understanding about practically everything - a home inspector's dream. But, during those travels and discussions with fellow home inspectors, I've heard horror stories of areas of the country where folks complain, find fault with just about everybody and everything, and sue at the drop of a hat. It appears that people that arrive here with that kind of attitude get cured of it pretty quickly or don't last long - they get shunned. Folks here are pretty laid back and just don't care much for trouble makers. Thank God.

Pennsylvania is considerably north of Richmond and I could imagine Apollos may not be able to hang up there.

Nonetheless, I may begin to state that opinions vary regarding the performance of and satisfaction with these systems. It can't hurt.

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We have an appollo system, in our attic with a 50 gallon water tank with it. Our plumber was here doing some work to our well tank and noticed that our hot water is "red" really just a rusty color. He alarmed me, said this is sediment and that my family isnt safe. He said that our appollo system is causing the problem and it needs to be changed out immediately. Can this be true? I have small children.

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That sounds a bit fishy. If you're on a well and the plumber identified the color in your water as sediment, how can the Apollo system be "the cause"?

Usually when you start getting sediment in your water it's because your submersible well pump is too close to the bottom of the well, which is a progressive event as sediment enters and settles at the bottom of the well. I had to have my well pump lifted a time or two, but it was because grit kept chewing up my well pumps, but the cause was similar.

You can have your water tested for a very reasonable price to eliminate all doubt regarding health and safety. Then, get a well specialist to determine where and how the sediment is entering the system.

Typically these heating systems use plastic distribution line and aluminum coils, I believe, so rust isn't probable.

After the problem is identified and eliminated, you may wish to have a plumber flush out systems and add a filtration system if you don't already have one.

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We have an appollo system, in our attic with a 50 gallon water tank with it. Our plumber was here doing some work to our well tank and noticed that our hot water is "red" really just a rusty color. He alarmed me, said this is sediment and that my family isnt safe. He said that our appollo system is causing the problem and it needs to be changed out immediately. Can this be true? I have small children.

Maybe it's just an old water heater and it's time to replace it. How old is the water heater and how often have you flushed that tank?

Water heaters all eventually rust out and all, regardless of age, accumulate rust and sediment at the bottom that has to be periodically flushed out of the system - that's a fact of life.

Private wells can and do become polluted but proper periodic maintenance of the well, tank flushing and regular testing and dosing when needed should keep bacteria in check. If you search the plumbing forum and the free downloads forum on this site, you can find an excellent online course about private wells and pumps and the issues they have. I think it was put together by Purdue University.

Around here, a water heater will last about 10 to 15 years, tops; 10 if they're never flushed and 15 if they're flushed annually and the anode rod is changed about halfway through expected service life. That's not a given - some need replacement earlier and many are ignored well beyond 15 years and aren't replaced until they're near collapse. However, the 10 to 15 years is a good rule of thumb around here.

Find out how long the average tank lasts in NC and then determine how old your tank is. You can find a water heater serial number date decoder on this site.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Hi,

Came across this discussion and thought this would be a good place to learn more about my Apollo System. Here are my Home owner specs:

Michigan

Duel Apollo sytems (upper/lower)

3600 sq.ft. split 60/40

75-gal water heaters (2)

Basement system.

Purchased house 3 years ago from the home builder. Home is 14-15 years old. No problems with the system except the talked about slow home temp increase response and fluctuating shower/faucet temperatures.

Just yesterday I had a tech from the original installers come out to inspect and evaluate my system. Did not realize until yesterday that my hot water heaters have a date of 1991. He stated that they have not installed an Apollo system in the last 10 years. He cleaned the heat exchangers and checked the system for leaks. Everything checked out ok except a very small gas leak at the secondary hot water temp controller. The aluminum block was striped, but he got it to seal.

The system undoubtedly works and without any problems for the past 3 years. However, I'm looking at replacing at least the tanks as a preventative measure and hoping to help my shower/faucet hot water fluctuation (maybe it's my temp valves instead). I'm not on a budget and am looking at updating my present system with new parts or going greener with possibly a Geothermal system in the Spring. I've just begun my research so I'm certainly open to alternative Heating/Cooling options other than Apollo and Geothermal.

Thanks for this thread,

Dave

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Welcome Dave!

Gas water heaters tend to last a good long time, so don't be surprised if you get another ten years out of the water heaters with very little significant maintenance.

If you aren't disappointed with the whole system's performance, I would just sit back and enjoy until replacement becomes a necessity. That's just my opinion, but if it isn't costly to run and ain't broke, resist the temptation to allegedly "fix it".

Another good reason to ride 'em out - the efficiency of future heating systems will continue to improve exponentially. The longer you wait, the faster the system you finally purchase will pay for itself. In the meantime, keep your ear to the rail regarding heating system technology so you have a good educated idea what direction you wish to go in when the time comes.

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Apollo Hydro Heat sucks! I live in Alabama and I can not keep my house warm during the winter, Ive replaced the coils, ran new lines, spent thousands only to have the company tell me my unit is working fine if the air coming out is 20 degrees warmer than the intake air. It is, but my house will not get above 65 when its freezing outside.

Does anyone have any suggestions? its 2010 and I should not have to freeze in my own home.

I am considering trying to insulate the unit itself, it is in my garage and very cold to the touch, would that help?

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Apollo Hydro Heat sucks! I live in Alabama and I can not keep my house warm during the winter, Ive replaced the coils, ran new lines, spent thousands only to have the company tell me my unit is working fine if the air coming out is 20 degrees warmer than the intake air. It is, but my house will not get above 65 when its freezing outside.

Does anyone have any suggestions? its 2010 and I should not have to freeze in my own home.

I am considering trying to insulate the unit itself, it is in my garage and very cold to the touch, would that help?

Maybe it's not the unit. A guy several posts above, who lives in Michigan where winters are colder than they are in Alabama reports his system is heating the house fine.

I was cadre at Ft. McClellan for about three years and the house I lived in was cold as hell in the winter - colder than the home I'd lived in when I'd been stationed in Massachusetts - because there was barely any insulation in the walls and above the ceilings and none over the crawlspace.

Are the walls and ceiling of the house insulated?

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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