Jump to content

Improper Grading


member deleted
 Share

Recommended Posts

I had a New Contruction inspection today that the buyers hired me to do the final walk through. This was the first and only inspection they have had for the new home.

Anyways, I get to the back of the house and find that the grading is slopped approx twelve feet from the top of the driveway to the back patio next to the rear sliding door for the basement. The way it is know, all the rain runoff will drain directly down the slop to the back door. The owners said the the builder refused to fix the grade as they did not see it as an issue.

I don't do very many new contruction inspections. Are there code references to the proper grading around the foundation that I can reference for this builder? If so, where would I find them?

I'd appreciate any feedback and advice.

Thanks,

Kevin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Both the IRC requires 6" slope away from the foundation in the first 10 ft., the UBC 6" in the first 6 ft. On a graded lot the top of foundation must be 12"+2% above the curb. The AHJ can override it though. New construction or not, if provisions are not made to get the wtaer away from the foundation, call it. It does not mateer if the AHJ approved it or not. A problem is a problem.

The last new house I did was a total screw up. The builder set it 12" too low. It cost him $30K to provide adequate site drainage.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In addition to Crusty's code references, there is simple common sense. Collecting several hundred square feet of water & directing it to a lower level door is pretty dense. Is there a drain in the patio, or any other drainage to collect the runoff? If not, it's flooded bsmt. time next time it rains.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the input. The owners called this morning wanting me to meet with the builder next week. Thanks for the references. Kurt, no there isn't a drainage for the back patio area. This is a $780,000 home and the way the grading is now, the basement will be flooded within the first few months.

I learn a lot from this site and I am thankful that it's here for home inspectors. I am just starting my second year and read this site everyday.

Thanks again,

Kevin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kevin,

If you are going to inspect new work you really should get certified in the IRC, and should own a copy of that book so you can cite code references.

The obvious question is where was the local code authority on this case?

The IRC requires "positive slope" and also requires a certain distance from the "toe" of a slope to a building's edge.

Regretably, site drainage is a common problem in new res construction these days.

If the site looks as bad as you say it does, I would tell the buyer to have the builder get a licensed designer to shoot grades on the site and prescribe a remedy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Jim Baird

Kevin,

If the site looks as bad as you say it does, I would tell the buyer to have the builder get a licensed designer to shoot grades on the site and prescribe a remedy.

What is a licensed designer? Do you mean a surveyor?

I have found that a landscape architect does a much better job at grade, site design and water management than anyone else.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd like to ask the moderator of this forum to step in and delete this entire thread.

If plumbers, roofers, landscapers, builders, etc. ever grasp the concept that water flows downhill we'll all be greeting shoppers at Wal-Mart within a year or two. Let's not promote the concept, OK?

Next thing you know you'll start promoting the replacement of air filters in HVAC equipment for Pete's sake. You guys are about one trick away from emptying out my bag, and I have kids to feed!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Scott,

I couldn't agree more. The landscape architects I've worked with seem to be civil engineers with imagination. Their bread and butter is showing people how to get water to go in the right direction. After that they can sell folks anything. I must be silent now because I have promised not to divulge any more of their professional secrets.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kevin,

You got it right. In our state (GA) licensed designer can include landscape architect, architect, engineer,(I'm not sure about surveyor for design).

Our state has just passed a law requiring residential contractors to be state licensed, but as yet provided no money or human resources.

Maybe progress will happen in due time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...