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Knob & Tube Electrodes?


caryseidner
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Does anyone know what the heck this is? This is an 85 year old house, and the line was entering through an exterior wall, just above grade. I didn't know if it was safe to put my voltage sniffer on it, but I probably should have waved it close by to see if there was any voltage. What are the vertical copper electrodes all about?

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Well . . . but then what I am I looking at when I see something similar that has K & T connected to one end, and low voltage wiring run toward the front door connected at the other end?

I don't remember who it may have been, but someone, at some point, told me the gizmo was designed to step down voltage.

'Course, maybe he was wrong sometimes . . . . .

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Well . . . but then what I am I looking at when I see something similar that has K & T connected to one end, and low voltage wiring run toward the front door connected at the other end?

No telling! Post a picture.

To change the voltage, you need a transformer. These are usually cube shaped things about 2 inches x 2 inches x 2 inches or larger.

Then in older homes, you have the "do-it-yourself" factor. Wiring may have been used for one thing at one time, then switched to another use at a later time. No telling what they may have done!

Modern doorbell transformer...

transformer_598.jpg

Old doorbell transformer...

S6300798.jpg

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That's an old phone company "protector". The orange tube is a fuse that was intended to go open. If you spin off the black cover in the middle you'll find "carbons". These are two assemblies consisting of a carbon blocks in a ceramic holder. The carbon block provides a ground path in the event of a high voltage hit. Go ahead, open it up and take a look!

was a phone man in my pre college days.

Tom Corrigan

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Well . . . but then what I am I looking at when I see something similar that has K & T connected to one end, and low voltage wiring run toward the front door connected at the other end?

No telling! Post a picture.

To change the voltage, you need a transformer. These are usually cube shaped things about 2 inches x 2 inches x 2 inches or larger.

Then in older homes, you have the "do-it-yourself" factor. Wiring may have been used for one thing at one time, then switched to another use at a later time. No telling what they may have done!

Modern doorbell transformer...

transformer_598.jpg

Old doorbell transformer...

S6300798.jpg

I, of course, have no photos of the thing I'm talking about. That would be waaay too convenient. But next time I happen upon one, I'll definitely snap a shot.

Thing is, there's 120 volts connected to one end of the ceramic housing, and low voltage wiring connected to the other end.

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...Thing is, there's 120 volts connected to one end of the ceramic housing, and low voltage wiring connected to the other end.

If all pro work, then probably a transformer.

BUT there is also the "do-it-yourself factor". I've seen all sorts of wire used in walls for regular house voltage (120V) wiring. You pull apart a wall and no telling what will be found!

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