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The "Original" Tea Party... Zeppelin-Mooring site


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the "Zep"'s Boston debut was in this structure... . I think it was 1969 ( winter?)... My brother was there. ( I saw 'the zep' later that year in Boston in October. Nothin like it... )

Now, the site has a 7-11 where I get lunch once in a while.. "so it goes'.. :)

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PS-it was a psychedelic interior of course... a la the Fillmore West (and East)... the whole 9 yards... the goobly amoeba projection-images, etc.. I saw "Mountain", "Jethro Tull" there as well...

Mountain was L-O-U-D. The air was thick with FAT guitar-tone. Played by a 'mountain' of a man in a Wild Bill Hickock leather-fringe shirt.. Leslie West.

That tune of theirs, "Mississippi Queen' was one fat sounding record and was seriously PHAT live... West played a Melody-maker Gibson straight into a series of Sunn Amps stacked up over each other.. A thousand pounds of 'tone'.. He played guitar like it was a sax..

He is of the "School Of Albert" (KING). "Crank it out"..

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Saw Allman Bros live on Cambridge, (MA) common BEFORE their first album came out.. (What a great band they were.. The original members.. they did that first album... awesome. truly a tough-sounding raunchy group.. .) Saw Buddy Miles there once sitting in with a band and playing guitar like that was his major axe. Great musician and singer (and guitar player).

Actually saw the Zep twice. by the way...

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Well, that clears up two of life's little mysteries. Back in the late 80's I bought two Fleetwood Mac CD's that were recorded at the The Boston Tea Party. I had always wondered what kind of a venue it was, although I have to admit, by the time the internet came along and I could easily look it up, I had kind of forgotten about it. I also wondered how many times they played there. Today I found out. They played The Tea Party 5 times, from 1968-1970.

Those whose only exposure to Fleetwood Mac has been the 70 & 80's era pop band might be surprised to know that they started out as a kick-ass seminal blues band. At one time, they had three lead guitarist/vocalists. How many bands had three lead guitarist/vocalists? I can't think of any others. The three videos below are from that era. Each was uploaded by a different user, but not only are they are from the same show (maybe at The Boston Tea Party?), but they are three songs that they played consecutively. So if you're inclined to watch them, let them all load, then play them consecutively to recreate being there (if just a little bit). The sound quality sucks, as does the camera work.

Here's Jeremy Spencer, who obviously wore out his Elmore James record collection when he was in his teens.

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Here's Danny Kirwan, (when he was about 18 or 19 years old) trading licks with Peter Green. He's seemingly unfazed when he breaks a string midway through the song.

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And finally, Peter Green, doing a solo The World Keep on Turning.

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Time hasn't been kind to those three. Jeremy Spencer quit the band abruptly (literally walking away and not telling anyone he wasn't coming back) and joined a religious cult. He has pretty much been out of the commercial music scene ever since.

Danny Kirwan was fired from the band, and after working a little in the 70's, stopped playing music and was actually homeless for a number of years.

Peter Green left the band he founded in 1970. He suffers from schizophrenia. He's had a very limited involvement in the music business in the years since.

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My one and only experience was the California Jam in April of 1974 at the Ontario Motor Speedway. Myself and a couple three other dumbass young Marines hitch hiked up there for the weekend.

400,000 plus wild childs in one place at the same time to watch

Seals and Crofts

Rare Earth

Earth, Wind & Fire

Eagles

Black Oak Arkansas

Black Sabbath

Deep Purple

Emerson, Lake & Palmer

We got a spot about 100 feet from the stage.

One of those wild weekend fond memories from long ago youth.

-

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For those who don't know, Peter Green (of Fleetwood Mac) wrote "Black Magic Woman", that hit of Santana's. Peter Green was one hell of a blues guitarist... Fleetwood Mac's version is eerie sounding...

We used to do a cover of Fleetwood Mac's 'Station Man' ... circa 1972 or so.. solid raunchy tune...

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Bands I've seen live (in no paticular order):

Wishbone Ash, Bruce Springsteen (who opened for Wishbone Ash - how funny is that), The Who (not with Kieth Moon), The Stones (a few times), Rod Stewart (a few times as well), Elton John, J. Giles, Joe Cocker, Linda Ronstat, James Taylor, Seals & Crofts, Humble Pie, Black Sabath, Eric Clapton (many, many times), Robert Plant (solo), Fanny, David Bowie (right after Spider from Mars came out), Eli Radish, Pure Prairie League, Savage Grace, Pink Floyd (right afer Dark Side of the Moon came out), Yes, Iggy Pop... I know I'm missing some but my memory is a little fuzzy from those times. [;)]

Seems I was always going to concerts back then but the music was sooo good from that era.

Neil Young and Crazy Horse.

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At one time, they had three lead guitarist/vocalists. How many bands had three lead guitarist/vocalists? I can't think of any others.

I don't know, do the Beatles qualify? [:)] No. The bass don't count. How about Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young? Yep, maybe that's it, though.

The Travelin Willburys? Yep, that's one other.

But could they all play lead guitar?

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My one and only experience was the California Jam in April of 1974 at the Ontario Motor Speedway. Myself and a couple three other dumbass young Marines hitch hiked up there for the weekend.

400,000 plus wild childs in one place at the same time to watch

Seals and Crofts

Rare Earth

Earth, Wind & Fire

Eagles

Black Oak Arkansas

Black Sabbath

Deep Purple

Emerson, Lake & Palmer

We got a spot about 100 feet from the stage.

One of those wild weekend fond memories from long ago youth.

-

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That was a great bill. One band that I am sorry I never got to see was ELP. Still in awe of Keith Emerson and his ability to interpret classical music in an inventive way.

Best concert for me was last year. We were given tickets to Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Concert at MSG. It was rock icon overload. If you have not seen it I think it is still on demand on HBO.

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For those who don't know, Peter Green (of Fleetwood Mac) wrote "Black Magic Woman", that hit of Santana's. Peter Green was one hell of a blues guitarist... Fleetwood Mac's version is eerie sounding...

Fer yer listening pleasure: Fleetwood Mac, recorded Live at The Boston Tea Party. Oh Well into Black Magic Woman http://www.box.net/shared/static/lnl0n3yf4t.mp3

It's my file, so I know it's safe to download it.

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Sorry for the diversion but at first glance of the subject I thought you were referring to this Zeppelin Mooring Site:

http://www.stuofdoom.com/hindenburg.html

My parents live in an adult community nearby. The hangers are huge!

Now back to your regularly scheduled programming...

Yeah,

When I first saw the title I thought it referred to the two zeppilin hangers just down the street from Frankfurt Airport and Rhine Main AB in Germany.

OT - OF!!!

M.

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Joe.. right on...thanks for posting that... You can hear that Mick Fleetwood was kind of "Bonham-Like" in a lot of ways... Those 2 guys did a lot of 'driving the bus' in those days and did so in those later years for all those hits they had.. "(Go your own way' for example).

Just to make it clear, the Boston Tea Party is pronounced: "Bahstin Tea Pahdee"

and of course the famous "Bahstin Gah-din", Home of the "Broonz" and the "Celts" and famous for 'Numbah Foa-ah" (Bobby Oaah)

And how can we fah-git, "Ken-moah Skwayah", right near Fenway Pahk"

The other day, during an inspection in Boston ("Hyde Pahk"), I actually said: "You bedda gedda gudda guy" and we all started laughing..

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  • 1 year later...

Last night I ran across this amazing gem from Fleetwood Mac's post Green/Spencer, pre Buckingham/Nicks transition period. It's a ferocious version of Bob Welch's Lay it All Down, from the Future Games album - four and a half minutes of rock & roll at its finest.

I bought the Future Games album in 1973, when I was 13. What the hell are 13 year olds listening to today? Whatever it is, I can't imagine they'll still be listening to it when they're in their 50's.

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While you guys were blowing your eardrums out, I was pursuing Charles Mingus, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, McCoy Tyner, Keith Jarrett, Ahmad Jamal, Grover Washington, George Benson (pre-Birdland), Sun Ra, Sonny Rollins, Sonny Stitt, Ornette Coleman, Lionel Hampton, MJQ, Dizzy, Oscar Peterson, Miles and Monk of course, etc., etc., in obscure jazz clubs in the forgotten part of towns.

I had to turn into an adult before I appreciated Hendrix, Zep, and the rest. As a result, I still have some hearing left.

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While you guys were blowing your eardrums out, I was pursuing Charles Mingus, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, McCoy Tyner, Keith Jarrett, Ahmad Jamal, Grover Washington, George Benson (pre-Birdland), Sun Ra, Sonny Rollins, Sonny Stitt, Ornette Coleman, Lionel Hampton, MJQ, Dizzy, Oscar Peterson, Miles and Monk of course, etc., etc., in obscure jazz clubs in the forgotten part of towns.

I had to turn into an adult before I appreciated Hendrix, Zep, and the rest. As a result, I still have some hearing left.

Kurt - you never cease to amaze me. That's a pretty fine listening list there.

The closest I came to hearing Zep was shortly before the group was formed. At the old Fillmore Auditorium in San Francisco, Bill Graham was fond of booking first rate jazz acts for the education of his audience. In the late 60's, I went there to see Cecil Taylor. The warmup act was billed as "The Yardbirds" which at that stage consisted of Jimmy Page and some irrelevant accompaniment. Cecil Taylor was amazing.

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