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Plumbing vent collars on beach front property


mgbinspect
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Greetings earthlings.

Got a question for the TIJ brain-trust:

Did a beauty of a home on the the Chesapeake Bay today

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with a priceless master bedroom balcony view:

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But, the roofing shingles completely surrounded the plumbing vent collar. Usually I write this up as amateur work. In this case, however, I find myself wondering if this isn't a deliberate practice in hurricane prone coastal areas. Anyone familiar with this setup?

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I'd prefer not to write it up if it's actually a good thing.

I'll be working on this one for a while. All insights welcome and appreciated.

Got another to post regarding the roof as well.

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There's a class of roofing contractor that believes that flashing is ugly and that there's no harm in completely covering all flashing with shingles and sealing it with roofing cement. I write these up because flashing is often galvanized steel and if you don't allow for water to escape and evaporate quickly, it will begin corroding in just a few days.

I learned this long ago when I left some newly purchased V-crimp roofing in an open trailer for a few days before starting the job. It had rained early on and when I removed the first sheet, the one below it had the beginnings of rust. The lumber yard confirmed this when I related the incident to them.

It's got nothing to do with hurricanes as far as I know and I've lived most of my life in a hurricane prone area.

Marc

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There's a class of roofing contractor that believes that flashing is ugly and that there's no harm in completely covering all flashing with shingles and sealing it with roofing cement. I write these up because flashing is often galvanized steel and if you don't allow for water to escape and evaporate quickly, it will begin corroding in just a few days.

I learned this long ago when I left some newly purchased V-crimp roofing in an open trailer for a few days before starting the job. It had rained early on and when I removed the first sheet, the one below it had the beginnings of rust. The lumber yard confirmed this when I related the incident to them.

Marc

The waviness of this pipe has me thinking it's copper and may actually have flashing soldered right to the pipe under the roofing. Anyone seen that?

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It's lead and if I did the roof it's how I would do it...you don't need to see the flashing for it to be lapped properly. I think this is the only point on which Jim Katen and I disagree.

Thanks, Chad! Am I right to assume it may have flashing soldered to the pipe under the roofing, or is it simpy depending on sealant?

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It looks like a one piece lead flashing jack, and there will be flashing placed beneath the shingles. It's wrong............ It's not as wrong if the flashing is just barely lapped by the shingles below as a decorative cover. So basically, if the shingles are trimmed the way they should be, the flashing should look just right.

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See...Brandon disagrees with me too.

It's not that I disagree with you Chad, it's that the manufacturers do.........

OK fine, I do as well. I don't like to see water trapped between the layers.

A good plumber could always just join most, if not all of the vent pipes, and run the stack through at/ near the ridge. Then, I wouldn't care much what was done at the termination.

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Thanks, Chad! Am I right to assume it may have flashing soldered to the pipe under the roofing, or is it simpy depending on sealant?

It is a one piece lead flashing that is not dependent on sealant, the lead is simply folded down inside the top of the stack and lapped properly under the shingles for a proper installation. NO SEALANT is needed except maybe a dab on exposed nail heads on the down hill side unless they are covered by shingles.

http://www.alibaba.com/product-free/291 ... readcrumbs

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Thanks, Chad! Am I right to assume it may have flashing soldered to the pipe under the roofing, or is it simpy depending on sealant?

It is a one piece lead flashing that is not dependent on sealant, the lead is simply folded down inside the top of the stack and lapped properly under the shingles for a proper installation. NO SEALANT is needed except maybe a dab on exposed nail heads on the down hill side unless they are covered by shingles.

Thanks, Jim!

Based upon the look of it, that makes sense. I'm comfortable with that.

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Googled 'lead roof jack' and got this.

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Done right, the lower part of the lead apron laps over the lower shingle so it is visible. No nails go into the lower portion of the jack. Then any water that gets in around the stack should stay up on the surface and flow out onto the shingles below. The way they did it is pretty but not correct. They don't know jack. [:)]

Will it leak? Probably not, provided there are no nails in the area below the stack. Can't see if there are any nails through those lower shingles into the jack. That would be potential leaks. So my vote -Keep it caulked or fix it.

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I was a little late adding the link that has a pretty good picture of the raw product.

Hey thanks all! This has been very educational. I've seen this setup on tons of flat roofs in the city, (and actually didn't make the connection) but have never seen the product before installation.

I'm satisfied that it's fine - in fact, in this environment, beyond fine - smart.

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It's lead and if I did the roof it's how I would do it...you don't need to see the flashing for it to be lapped properly. I think this is the only point on which Jim Katen and I disagree.

Huh, what? When did I disagree about that?

In terms of function, as long as the shingles overlap the flashing uphill of the pipe and the flashing overlaps the shingles downhill of the pipe, I don't care if they lay an intermediate course of shingles over the flashing to make it disappear. My objection to doing it that way is that it looks as if you're embarassed about the fact your roof has to have flashings on it, and you're trying to hide them.

I prefer the way it looks when done properly, by the book. I enjoy looking at crisply trimmed flashings that are properly interleaved with the shingles.

I prefer to celebrate the flashings.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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I prefer to celebrate the flashings.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

That's funny. I'm so used to seeing the flashing, and equally annoyed when it's done carelessly or covered up completely. In most cases, it's not done right. Yet, in this situation, with the rear of the building facing due south which tends to be head into oncoming hurricanes, it's probably the best choice. It's amazing how even the slightest loose roofing shingle can be the beginning of a whole section or slope of roofing being peeled right off.

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I guess my disdain for covered up flashing is that I'm aware of its function. It's a vital function and as an inspector, I'd like to confirm as much as possible that it is present and properly installed. I can't do that if it's coverd up for purely cosmetic reasons. Sometimes function is beautiful.

Marc

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