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Proper nailing of starter course


Marc
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Just received my copy of Certainteed's Shingle Applicator's Manual, 9th Edition. Page 93 says a starter course can consist of regular shingles with 5" taken off the bottom. But, with 1/2" overhang, that puts the nail line only 5/8th from the lower end of the flashing along the eaves.

I've lifted the starter course on every house I've ever inspected in the last 8 years to check for proper installation of the felt. None were secured that close to the bottom. Most about 4 to 6" up.

What did I miss?

Marc

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Just received my copy of Certainteed's Shingle Applicator's Manual, 9th Edition. Page 93 says a starter course can consist of regular shingles with 5" taken off the bottom. But, with 1/2" overhang, that puts the nail line only 5/8th from the lower end of the flashing along the eaves.

I've lifted the starter course on every house I've ever inspected in the last 8 years to check for proper installation of the felt. None were secured that close to the bottom. Most about 4 to 6" up.

What did I miss?

Marc

I occasionally see them installed as Certainteed described. But mostly I still see them done the way I used to do them -- with a three-tab strip turned 180 degrees and nailed along its upper edge. It's a poor practice.

I think that the way Certainteed describes is fine. Aside from the fact that no one in your area seems to do it that way, what's the problem with it?

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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I occasionally see them installed as Certainteed described. But mostly I still see them done the way I used to do them -- with a three-tab strip turned 180 degrees and nailed along its upper edge. It's a poor practice.

I think that the way Certainteed describes is fine. Aside from the fact that no one in your area seems to do it that way, what's the problem with it?

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Wind resistance is affected, which is a big thing here in hurricane country. If I start writing them all up, every roofer in town as well as builder, agent, seller, etc is going to be across the table from me with me waving my Certainteed Shingle Applicator's Manual at them. I don't know if I envy such a situation.

Marc

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Hi,

Doesn't that place the seal strip right there at the edge of the roof where you want the overlapping shingle in the first course to adhere to it? Your're just removing the 5-inch reveal so that the seal strip will activate and prevent the edges of the shingle from lifting.

My father taught me to cut away the tabs and flip them 180° but that puts the adhesive strip about 5-1/2-inches from the edge of the roof and then you have to hand-adhere every shingle to the starter course. Sounds like Certainteed is trying to make the process a little easier.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Marc, I call out almost every roof with improper starter strip installation and include a graphic of the correct way to install. That graphic is right next to a picture of me lifting the free shingle tab up, most people get it. I don't know who started the bit about turning the shingle around 180 degrees but it sure is popular around here. Popular, but wrong.

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Marc, I call out almost every roof with improper starter strip installation and include a graphic of the correct way to install. That graphic is right next to a picture of me lifting the free shingle tab up, most people get it. I don't know who started the bit about turning the shingle around 180 degrees but it sure is popular around here. Popular, but wrong.

I think the 180 turning thing is as old as asphalt composition shingles. I know that it goes back at least as far at the late '60s. Clearly, it's better to trim them & leave them right side up, but the ancient ways die hard.

Up here, we often see 1x3 drip edge flashing. I'd really prefer that roofers not nail through the 3" leg on that flashing. If you were to do it Certainteed's way, the nails would only be about a half inch up from the drip edge and they'd puncture the flashing. If I were to install a roof tomorrow, I'd trim the starter strip but still place my nails 5" or 6" up from the drip edge. If I were concerned about wind, I'd seal it to the drip edge flashing with mastic.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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All the manufacturers are putting the adhesive on on the underside of the shingle at the bottom.

I install the first course, nail it about three inches up from the bottom, then another course right on top with staggered seams. There's no reason to cut anything or turn anything upside down, the initial course glues down to the ice and water or drip and the next course glues to the initial course.

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All the manufacturers are putting the adhesive on on the underside of the shingle at the bottom.

I install the first course, nail it about three inches up from the bottom, then another course right on top with staggered seams. There's no reason to cut anything or turn anything upside down, the initial course glues down to the ice and water or drip and the next course glues to the initial course.

How does the 1st course get adhered to the starter? The factory adhesive strip would be too high if you don't trim 5" off.

Marc

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How does the 1st course get adhered to the starter? The factory adhesive strip would be too high if you don't trim 5" off.

The trend is for the manufacturers to put the adhesive strip on the underside of the shingle instead of on the top as it always used to be. If you're using a shingle like that, it doesn't matter what you do with the starter strip. The first course will adhere to it along the leading edge anyway.

Chad said "all" but that information must not have found its way out west yet. About half of the manufacturers out here put the adhesive on the bottom. The rest are still on the top.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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I do whatever it says on the shingle pack I'm working with, and sometimes I make up my own if I think it's appropriate (horrors).

I think good IWS, valley liners, and metal drip edge is way more important than any starter strip method.

But, it's interesting to read this thread. The 180 method does die hard.

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I do whatever it says on the shingle pack I'm working with, and sometimes I make up my own if I think it's appropriate (horrors).

I think good IWS, valley liners, and metal drip edge is way more important than any starter strip method.

But, it's interesting to read this thread. The 180 method does die hard.

Wind is much more of a concern than IWS, valley liner and metal drip edge here although strangely the loose tabs on the edge of the roof are not nearly as susceptible to blow off as one would imagine. It is much more likely that a single shingle that is loose in the upper half of the roof plane will cause a problem than the entire row at the leading edge. I'm sure it has something to do with lift and acceleration as the wind passes over the roof but that is way beyond my pay grade[:-taped]. I just tell them to do it like the manufacturer says.

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