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(IMO, code ought to require a permanent anchor at the top of every combination of roof planes. I would certainly do a better inspection if fall protection was readily available, and I suspect this is true of most others as well, irrespective of their opinion absent the opportunity.)

In China, lots of houses have grab bars and safety rails @ the hips and eaves so the tile roofing can be inspected and repaired.

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(IMO, code ought to require a permanent anchor at the top of every combination of roof planes. I would certainly do a better inspection if fall protection was readily available, and I suspect this is true of most others as well, irrespective of their opinion absent the opportunity.)

There's a subdivision here where the roofers left their anchors on the ridges instead of pulling them out on the last day. Good idea, but somebody's still got to climb up to attach that rope.

That appears to be a 12 in 12. I used to do a lot of roofing, but I would have scaffolding under me on that slope. We'd have the ladder off the scaffold up to the peak to do the ridge. I had an 8 in 12 today, 2 storys up, too steep for safety. I used a proper extension ladder and got views of all sides, lots of pics. Found enough bad shingles to make my assessment.

Ever had a rake board split off in your hand?

Ever grabbed a vent cover and had a swarm of yellow jackets come out of there?

The loose shingle is another one. One small surprise and hopefully you wake up in a hospital. One guy I know took 3 days to wake up.

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(IMO, code ought to require a permanent anchor at the top of every combination of roof planes. I would certainly do a better inspection if fall protection was readily available, and I suspect this is true of most others as well, irrespective of their opinion absent the opportunity.)

There's a subdivision here where the roofers left their anchors on the ridges instead of pulling them out on the last day. Good idea, but somebody's still got to climb up to attach that rope.
Hi,

They are left in place on nearly all new construction here. Like you have pointed out, they are useless until you get up there to them and by then you've seen everything you need to see and are on your way back down again. I routinely find them left uncovered on new homes and I write it up because the anchors leak if the covers are missing or left off.

About 4-5 years ago I inspected 15 eight-year-old homes that Quadrant was forced to buy back from their owners. Of those 15 homes, I found 8 of them with the covers missing from one or more anchors. Of those 8, 5 had seals that were distorted or sun damaged and were leaking into the roof plane below. 3 of those had rot damage to the deck and top chord of the truss they were attached to.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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About 4-5 years ago I inspected 15 eight-year-old homes that Quadrant was forced to buy back from their owners. Of those 15 homes, I found 8 of them with the covers missing from one or more anchors. Of those 8, 5 had seals that were distorted or sun damaged and were leaking into the roof plane below. 3 of those had rot damage to the deck and top chord of the truss they were attached to.

Were they the Super Anchors or some other type?

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In China, lots of houses have grab bars and safety rails @ the hips and eaves so the tile roofing can be inspected and repaired.

As anyone who has ever walked up a steep roof with the assistance of a safety line knows, it's far easier and safer than without.

Just about any kind of device which provides that sort of assistance is going to be a huge help even if it does not provide full "fall protection".

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C'mon friends. Being a successful roof-climber (success is defined here as someone who doesn't suffer an injurious fall) has nothing to do with guts. You have to be fit and smart, that's all. 'Guts' are for risk-takers and Chad is too bright to risk his neck for an inspection fee.

If you're reasonably fit and you know what you are doing, you'd make a good ladder monkey. If you're a risk-taker, the numbers will eventually catch up with you and land you in an ER.

Like Bain said, Be careful.

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C'mon friends. Being a successful roof-climber (success is defined here as someone who doesn't suffer an injurious fall) has nothing to do with guts. You have to be fit and smart, that's all. 'Guts' are for risk-takers and Chad is too bright to risk his neck for an inspection fee.

If you're reasonably fit and you know what you are doing, you'd make a good ladder monkey. If you're a risk-taker, the numbers will eventually catch up with you and land you in an ER.

Like Bain said, Be careful.

Agreed, be careful.

If an inspector doesn't want to climb up onto a roof to inspect it; that's going to be up to that inspector and nobody else. I'm very expereinced at scaling structures; yet, there's a little voice in my head that tells me when I'm pushing it. Not listening to that inner voice will get one in trouble.

Inspectors just need to keep in mind that if they are ever challenged by an unhappy client in court, because they missed something they might have found had they climbed up onto the roof, they need to have made a reasonable effort to meet the local standard of care.

If, despite everything else, the locally accepted standard of care by the overwhelming majority of inspectors in a region is to climb up onto roofs and the inspector didn't do that, the unhappy client's lawyer might just have another more-skilled-at-roof-climbing inspector waiting in the wings who will happily sit there in the courtroom and explain how he or she had easily been able to get up onto that roof and find the issue that the errant inspector had missed.

After that, whether or not it bites the defendant in the ass will depend on how well that inspector's lawyer can convince the judge or jury that, despite the other side's contentions, the inspector had done everything that he or she could have been reasonably expected to do under the circumstances.

Depending on what part of the country one is operating in, and the prevailing attitudes toward inspections and home inspectors, I should think an inspector has a 50/50 chance of walking away unscathed or being nailed to a cross.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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We had this big 35'+ pine tree in front of our house when I was young and my dad wanted Christmas lights all the way to the top every year. We would combine 2 extension ladders stretched out and tied together with rope and lean it against the tree. Since I was youngest and lightest, I had to go all the way up to the top and hang the lights with pine branches in my face and my dad across the street yelling, "we need more lights on the left." It was always windy and the tree would move back and forth about a foot. My brothers would steady the ladder best they could from the ground.

My mom would say, "Joe, you are nuts. Don't even think about sending him up there." My dad would say, "Mike, are you a *****? Get your ass up there." I always went up but only because I didn't know any better and I had to.

Anyway, this roof in question is too steep to safely climb and I'm glad nothing bad happened. I know Mike O is a climb almost every roof advocate but not this one IMO. F*ck the courts.

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Time for a new poll question...............

Would you follow Chad up on this roof?[:-splat]

Not a snowballs chance in hell. If I am expending all of my concentration on staying alive/adhered to the roof, I would have just as good a chance of missing something right in front of me as I would from the eaves. A mans gotta know his limitations.

Tim

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