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Inspected a home that was approximately 800 sq ft. 90+ years old, but remodeled interior. 2 bed 1 bath, kitchen, living room, laundry room. The only heat source is a free standing gas stove in the family room. Kitchen is in a different location from the family room as is the bathroom and laundry room. Both bedrooms don't have a heat source.

Is that a sufficient source of heat for that many rooms?

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It's a 90 year old house. I don't think any code applies.

I've seen a few old houses like that with central heaters - a bunch of them were built post-WWII in Mountlake Terrace.

I guess the question is whether the gas space heater can heat the entire house.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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I forget that other places aren't Chicago. Our "code" is the gas companies constantly evolving rule-base, and they state nothing is grandfathered.

If code compliance is not a concern, it's probably fine until someone closes a BR door. It doesn't take much to heat 800sf. I used to heat an 800sf cottage with 3 1500kw heaters.

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We easily heat our 1100 foot 1935 single story with a small central woodstove. It is tight and well insulated, which is critical. About 2/3 is open plan, the rest bedrooms/bathroom/laundry. They stay within a few degrees. I see a lot of houses here that have a woodstove as primary heat, maybe a bit added by baseboards but often not.

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Inspected a home that was approximately 800 sq ft. 90+ years old, but remodeled interior. 2 bed 1 bath, kitchen, living room, laundry room. The only heat source is a free standing gas stove in the family room. Kitchen is in a different location from the family room as is the bathroom and laundry room. Both bedrooms don't have a heat source.

Is that a sufficient source of heat for that many rooms?

If they're trying to get a loan, in my area, most lenders would want a heat source in each room.

Also, if the remodel had been done with permits, the AHJ would have required heat in each room.

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R303.8 Required heating. When the winter design temperature in Table R301.2(1) is below 60F, every dwelling unit shall be provided with heating facilities capable of maintaining a minimum room temperature of 68F at a point 3 feet above the floor and 2 feet from exterior walls in all habitable rooms at the design temperature. The installation of one or more portable space heaters shall not be used to achieve compliance with this section.
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R303.8 Required heating. When the winter design temperature in Table R301.2(1) is below 60F, every dwelling unit shall be provided with heating facilities capable of maintaining a minimum room temperature of 68F at a point 3 feet above the floor and 2 feet from exterior walls in all habitable rooms at the design temperature. The installation of one or more portable space heaters shall not be used to achieve compliance with this section.

Yes, but if it was a 1935 house and if the remodel was such that permits weren't necessary, there would be no reason for the house to comply with this modern code standard.

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A lack of heat in any room is a concern, IMO.

The danger is flaky space heaters on overloaded extension cords, which can be deadly.

Sweating windows and mould in closets from people sleeping in icy rooms is a minor issue, but not good. We've all inspected rental housing where people have lived without heat. Mold between the bed and the wall. Mould on the bathroom ceiling.

The house I grew up in had a kitchen cookstove and a fireplace for heat. The doors were kept closed and the only heat in my bedroom was a hot water bottle, member those?? I don't remember ever seeing mold, though. Too cold, maybe.

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Yes, but if it was a 1935 house and if the remodel was such that permits weren't necessary, there would be no reason for the house to comply with this modern code standard.

Someone brought up "code", so i posted it.

It's not a bad reference for modern living standards. Most residential buildings I inspect only had fireplaces and/or coal stoves in a few rooms as the original sources of heat. I wouldn't want any of my clients not being made aware that when centralized heat was added, there is likely inadequate heat in habitable rooms.

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I inspected a 100 yr old house full of starving students. They had run out of furnace oil and were heating a dozen little rooms and hovels with electric space heaters on extension cords. There were a half a dozen 30 amp fuses on the branch circuits. Smoke alarms were all dead or disabled. And we used to think college students were the smarter kids. [:)]

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