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U.S. housing map: When most homes were built.


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It could be far worse Rob. You could be in a place where nearly everything was built after 1980.

Those are the places that wear me out.

They wear Bill K and myself out TOO! But factor in a shack like this: Blt 1830, additions in 1880, 1910 and 1950 AND a detached barn... .. it gets trick up here..

:)

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Notice how the age of homes in the north vs south closely mirrors the common availability of air conditioning.

I never would have thought of that.

For a guy who focuses on historic homes, PA looks like the place to be.

Serving Eastern PA and parts of NJ is really amazing for old buildings. I get to see German, English, Scotch-Irish, Dutch and Swedish built Colonial-era homes. I really prefer the buildings that were built 30 to 80 years before George Washington was born.

Like Rob, I find the inevitable multiple additions and alterations make this job a challenge.

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Scotch is a drink. The people are Scots-Irish.

Scotch-Irish or Scots-Irish - either spelling is acceptable for the last 3 centuries, except to some recent proponents of the latter phrase. That's why there's the Scotch-Irish Society of the United States, the Journal of Scotch-Irish Studies, the Center for Scotch-Irish Studies and many books and papers authored by scholars about the Ulster Scots with Scotch-Irish in the title.

I'm right where the Scotch-Irish first settled here and later immigrants disembarked. When researching primary documentation of historic buildings, communities and genealogy, it's almost always written as Scotch-Irish.

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Bill,

I have no desire to try address your undefeatable need to be correct in all things, nor your unfailing need to get the last word. We could trade links to usages of both all day long, but I'm sure your will is stronger than mine on this issue, so I'll pass.

I guess I am also Scots-Irish, though I consider myself an American. In any case, that's irrelevant. Neither gives me (or you) any real credibility on the subject.

Do some looking around. It may give you a new perspective. If you find that it opens your mind to valuable points of view that differ from your own.

The Associated Press Stylebook says: "The people are the Scots, not the Scotch."

Better yet, find yourself a Scot and ask him if he's "scotch."

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This has absolutely nothing to do with people that live in Scotland. This is about a phrase that was created by the people that came to America from Ulster Ireland, to differentiate themselves from the Irish immigrants from the potato famine era. An overwhelming majority of primary documents I've seen from the period show the phrase Scotch-Irish.

I'm open to other points of view Jim, if they were based on facts. You were the one to make a statement that you have yet to support. Pointing out my character flaws instead of providing facts on the issue is your rebuttal? Really?

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Bill,

Surely you will recall that:

Ulster is, and was at the time you refer to, not in Ireland, but in Great Britain. (Don't feel badly, you weren't too far off.) Many residents of Ulster -today and then- trace their roots and religion to Scotland. Yes, it most definitely does have to do with Scottish lineage.

Also, most primary documents concerning slavery use a different word for black folks than is considered acceptable today. Is that really your argument? Or is it actually mine?

Jim

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Bill,

Surely you will recall that:

Ulster is, and was at the time you refer to, not in Ireland, but in Great Britain. (Don't feel badly, you weren't too far off.)

That's not correct. Ulster is a nine county province in Ireland. 6 of the counties are in what is now called Northern Ireland and 3 are in the Republic of Ireland. Northern Ireland was created in the early 1920s to REMAIN under the rule of the United Kingdom. Until then, all of Ireland was part of the United Kingdom since 1800.
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Notice how the age of homes in the north vs south closely mirrors the common availability of air conditioning.

I never would have thought of that.

For a guy who focuses on historic homes, PA looks like the place to be.

Serving Eastern PA and parts of NJ is really amazing for old buildings. I get to see German, English, Scotch-Irish, Dutch and Swedish built Colonial-era homes. I really prefer the buildings that were built 30 to 80 years before George Washington was born.

Like Rob, I find the inevitable multiple additions and alterations make this job a challenge.

Bill, If I wanted to tour historic towns in eastern PA or parts of NJ, what would you recommend?

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You can't go wrong with Bethlehem, John. It's only about three hours away from you. Be aware that it's overrun by tourists between Thanksgiving and Christmas, but if you come with your wife and she's not into old buildings, there's plenty of shopping opportunities to keep her occupied. I'd be more than happy to take you around.

This is America's first industrial park:

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The 1741 Gemeinhaus is the largest 18th century log building in the United States:

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Plus, Bethlehem is a politically diverse city!

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Bethlehem is very nice. Some pretty unique and early German buildings. Also, go up the hill to the residential area to see a wide range of Victorian styles.

Other areas:

Drive along each side of the Delaware River in Bucks County, PA and Hunterdon County, NJ. There are many towns and villages that grew up around 18th century ferry crossings and river-powered mills. Lots of specialty shops and restaurants too.

In PA:

Doylestown, the Bucks County Seat

Fallsington - has many historic homes spanning 3 centuries. I lived there for ten years in a house built in 1690

You can also visit Washington's Crossing park, with a few preserved buildings

Old City and Society Hill sections of Philadelphia

There are also many amazing historic buildings scattered all around in rural areas and hidden in developed areas

In NJ:

Princeton, Mercer County

Flemington, the Hunterdon County Seat

Cape May -a Victorian era resort town

Allaire Village - due to funding, now only open certain weekends

And, some more sites listed here: http://www.funnewjersey.com/upload_user ... LLAGES.htm

Here's some pics of historic homes in the area: http://historicbldgs.com/gallery.htm

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