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I thought that I should pass this along in case anyone was interested.

This is what my research has shown:

In an existing building, the labeling (therefore triggering a study) must be completed if the equipment is going to be worked on hot.

So if you are in a commercial facility and you pass people working on the hot panels while you are there, and it is not labeled, then you should mention it in the report. This may be true in residential as well - I am not sure.

Will this happen? Probably not, but it is a requirement of NFPA 70E for those circumstances.

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I thought that I should pass this along in case anyone was interested.

This is what my research has shown:

In an existing building, the labeling (therefore triggering a study) must be completed if the equipment is going to be worked on hot.

So if you are in a commercial facility and you pass people working on the hot panels while you are there, and it is not labeled, then you should mention it in the report. This may be true in residential as well - I am not sure.

Will this happen? Probably not, but it is a requirement of NFPA 70E for those circumstances.

Labeled how?

Marc

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I thought that I should pass this along in case anyone was interested.

This is what my research has shown:

In an existing building, the labeling (therefore triggering a study) must be completed if the equipment is going to be worked on hot.

So if you are in a commercial facility and you pass people working on the hot panels while you are there, and it is not labeled, then you should mention it in the report. This may be true in residential as well - I am not sure.

Will this happen? Probably not, but it is a requirement of NFPA 70E for those circumstances.

Are you inspecting the building or are you the employer or facilities manager?

NFPA 70E is the guidelines for worker safety developed for OSHA - it's not for any building codes. If you are going to report on signs for approach boundaries, you had better have done arc flash and shock hazard analysis to determine where signs are needed. Are you going to report on all of the other OSHA requirements for worker safety too?

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I am inspecting the building not the practices of the building. So, yes - this is really out of our realm.

I originally asked this topic because I had seen it called out on another inspector's report as being required by code. It appears this was not really needed because he had no other explanation other than "complete arc flash study as required by code".

I hope that this post helps others who may hear about this subject and need more info to clear it up.

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That's an awful lot of regulation.

At some point, the plant electrician ends up working more for OSHA than the company that pays him.

Like doctors answering more to the regs than the patient.

I don't like where regulations are going.

Marc

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