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EIFS Certification


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I got something in the mail today from AWCI (Association of the Wall and Ceiling Industry), advertising some EIFS Certification Seminars coming up.

I'm interested in getting my Inspector's Certificate, and I'm wondering if any of you know about AWCI, or recommend another institution.

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AWCI is good, but I really think EDI "Exterior Design Institute" is better. I have attended both, and I felt that AWCI was geared more towards the benefit of the manufacturers and not the crap that was installed wrong on the homes. EDI seemed to deal more with testing procedures and other moisture related problems and how to write reports on what you found. When it was all said and done with, both provide the same basic information and when I took the classes they even used the same books.

I kept my AWCI accreditation for about a year and my EDI accreditation for seven years and I just dropped it this year. I did not see any sense in paying a couple hundred dollars a year to say I was "Certified" and to be listed on a website that most folks could never find.

The education is good and can be related to just about any cladding on a home or building. It will open your eyes as to how moisture enters a structure.

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WJ. I couldn't agree with you more, especially in regards to residential installations.

EIFS has been a pet peeve of mine for quite some time, and it is for that reason that I felt it was necessary to learn all about it.

The idea itself happens to be good. Outsulation instead of insulation.

Actually, I do have an idea that would revolutionize the EIFS industry and make it pretty much "fool proof". If ever I hook up with the right person or group that I feel confident will not steal it from me, it may come to pass. I assure you, it would revolutionize the industry.

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Originally posted by StevenT

. . . Actually, I do have an idea that would revolutionize the EIFS industry and make it pretty much "fool proof". If ever I hook up with the right person or group that I feel confident will not steal it from me, it may come to pass. I assure you, it would revolutionize the industry.

Only allow EIFS-clad buildings to be built inside dry warehouses?

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Commercial installations cost more, thus allowing for a better installation. There are a few... very few... installers that do have the knowledge and are willing to install the system properly.

Adhering to strict installation standards and insisting upon progress inspections during the installation will help provide for a better finished product. Unfortunately, most residential installations do not provide for this.

Once again, my idea would change all of that.

A friend of mine is an inventor. If there is a cheap way that I could protect my idea, I will share it.

Until then, I couldn't agree with you more.

When I first encountered EIFS, I thought it was great and loved it. As time went on and it's short comings became known, I hated it. When I became an inspector, as far as I was concerned, if a house had EIFS on it, it "failed" as soon as I pulled into the driveway.

Since it is and continues to be an accepted and widely used product in the industry, I felt I needed to back up my opinion with factual knowledge. I also felt that it was necessary it "pass" or "fail" each installation on it's own merit. That is why I became certified in it's inspection.

There are installation methods that address it's short comings, which by the way are really due to the fact that the material used is too good... too waterproof and vapor proof. I have yet to see this type of installation on residential, and even if it were, most installers don't know and don't care enough to install it correctly. If installed incorrrectly, the drainable systems won't work either. There are also other issues that I have regarding even the drainable systems that have not been addressed. Such as vapor.

Just like it is the vapor that makes gasoline so volitile, I believe it is the vapor that make moisture so damaging. Water in a liquid form can be drained off, it is the vapor that is much more difficult to deal with.

Just like any building envelope, breath-ability is very important.

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One of the major problems of EIFS outside of the improper application of it, is that it was originally never really designed to be placed over wood substrates. I believe an Engineer from Pleko was the one who sent a letter to his superiors saying this and warning them of the problems, this is what helped fuel many of the lawsuits.

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Steve if you have a great idea ,do not wait for the right individual or someone else will think of the same thing before you move on it.

Get a patent.

I have never applied for one but understand the can be done with no lawyer for under $100.00

Donny Duecth on CNBC is always talking about it.

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