Jump to content

reglets, raggles, raglins


Chad Fabry
 Share

Recommended Posts

I've always called the groove cut into masonry or that is cast into masonry to receive a flashing, a "reglet". Well, not always but for at least the past 10 years or so.

I was horrified to find the word in several dictionaries with a definition that reads like this: A thin strip of metal or wood separating two roof surfaces.

That definition would make the step flashing or counter flashing the reglet, and the kerf the reglet cut.

So after reading some old books and googling about I found that reglet, raggle and raglin are indeed names for the kerf and are reasonably synonymous.

What terms do you use?

I have to explain or define any of them anyway but I'd like to use the words that most accurately describes that groove.

I know...Chad get a life.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Chad Fabry

I've always called the groove cut into masonry or that is cast into masonry to receive a flashing, a "reglet". Well, not always but for at least the past 10 years or so.

I've always called it a reglet as well, but I think that is a recent use of the word.

I've never seen reglet, in texts before 1900, referring to anything but a flat moulding used to cover joints, separate panels or divide compartments.

In the past 30 years, no one who installs flashings knows what it is. In the last 10, they've lost the ability to even install the counter flashing.

2007103120154_flash.BMP

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What's wrong with calling it a groove? Everybody understands groove.

I call it a slot but follow that with 'reglet' in parentheses.

Clients that have historic homes expect a home inspection and some education. I like to charge for, and provide, both. I also touch on appropriate materials and changes that will maintain the essence of the home while providing modern day comforts.

If I had my choice, (and the ability) I'd write in the same style as Eric Sloane and create a novel that explained all the circumstances that brought the house to its current state.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thorsten Veblen said the more that jargon & technical language is involved in an endeavor, the more we may assume the endeavor is make-believe.

I call it a groove. Before I advanced to WJ101, I used to call it a mortise, but that's kinda like reglet; no one is gonna know what it means.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Chad Fabry

What's wrong with calling it a groove? Everybody understands groove.

I call it a slot but follow that with 'reglet' in parentheses.

Chad, you are scaring me. We either think alike or some of you rubbed off on me when I was in Rochester.

When speaking to my client, I just say: "The top of the counter flashing should be inserted into a slot about 1 inch deep that is cut into the mortar joint between the brick courses". I wouldn't use the term reglet unless I knew I was talking to a roofer or a mason.

In my report I write: "The top of the counter flashing should be inserted into a slot (reglet) about 1 inch deep that is cut into the mortar joint between the brick courses". The reason for the difference between what I write and what I say is because immediately after that sentence is this one: "Have a qualified roofer or mason properly flash the chimney." I'm writing to two audiences at the same time -- the client, who I am telling to get it fixed, and the guy who is doing the fixing.

I'm not consistent about whether I put the proper term or the common term inside parentheses. (perhaps I should be?) It usually comes down to the context and who I think is the primary audience for that particular comment.

In the electrical section I tend to use proper terms and then put the common term inside parentheses. In the electrical section my observations (my description of what is wrong) are written primarily for the electrician, who has to find the problem and fix it. In most cases my description of the problem is not what is going to compel the client to take action to get it fixed. It is what I write about the implications of the problem (e.g., "this increases the risk of fire") that prompts action by the client, so those sentences have a primary audience of the client.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Chad Fabry

It wouldn't be a mortise. A kerf or ,dado but not a mortise.

I know that. That's why I call it a groove. No one knows what any of this stuff means anyway.

That's why I'm migrating more and more to picture reports.

Admit it, though; what really got you, is I referenced Veblen, and you didn't, right?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by kurt

Thorsten Veblen said the more that jargon & technical language is involved in an endeavor, the more we may assume the endeavor is make-believe.

Kurt makes a good point. The time for me to impress my client with my knowledge is prior to booking the inspection. After that, the most important thing is that the client can understand what I am trying to say. Use too much jargon and technical language and you lose him.

I'm building my business one satisfied client at a time. After the inspection is over, my report is the only tangible product of my work. Although I write my report for my client, and I release it only to my client, my client is not going to be the only person who reads it. As inspectors we are skilled at looking at technical things. In my report I believe that I need to use some technical language in order to be credible to other people who may read my report, in particular, to tradespeople who have a tendency to build themselves up by tearing the inspector down.

It's a balancing act that I'm still working on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Les

Chad Chad Chad - they think I am more crazy in the office. They heard my laughs way down the hall!

Are "they" female office help? I hope that your wife isn't leaving you unsupervised around other women. Those sexual harrassment lawsuits will wipe you out likety-split.

For those of you wondering - After Missouri, my impression is that Les is sort of the Denny Crane of the home inspection business. It's a wonder his wife hasn't cut a reglet in his forehead, or someplace lower, by now.

OT - OF!!!

M.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by hausdok

Originally posted by Les

Chad Chad Chad - they think I am more crazy in the office. They heard my laughs way down the hall!

After Missouri, my impression is that Les is sort of the Denny Crane of the home inspection business. It's a wonder his wife hasn't cut a reglet in his forehead, or someplace lower, by now.

I have really enjoyed this thread. There's no other site where such cool people leave their egos at the door and just enjoy the comfort of friendly conversation!

And if Mike is right, it's no wonder I like Les so much - Denny Crane is my hero (serious politics aside, of course).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Warning: thread drift!

Ya know what ... it's funny. I signed up for this forum never imagining I would be exposed to the type of humor and, more importantly, the depth and breadth of knowledge represented here. I don't mean just home inspection knowledge. I hadn't thought a lot about good ol' Thorstein Veblen since my college years. I wrote a paper on The Theory of The Leisure Class during my freshman year. The course was called something like "The History of Western Thought". I don't remember exactly; after all, it was my freshman year. There was some beer involved. A liberal arts college does that to you.

And now? Now I spend my days inspecting status symbol homes for those following their conspicuous consumption muse. Occasionally, those days involve crawling around in rodent droppings.

I don't feel cheated.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...