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Bryant16e
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Im alittle confused please view the attached photos and advise. Is there is a problem where the nail come through the sheathing?

Yes I know about the hole in and the leaks just asking about the nails. Also the first pic is that just poor construction or a problem?

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Originally posted by Bryant16e

Im alittle confused please view the attached photos and advise. Is there is a problem where the nail come through the sheathing?

Yes I know about the hole in and the leaks just asking about the nails. Also the first pic is that just poor construction or a problem?

Nails that stick out past the bottom of the plywood aren't a problem per se.

The construction in these pictures looks as if it's well beyond "a problem."

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by Bryant16e

Jim please elaborate.....

In addition to the water damage and rot that's obvious in the picture, I seen wood that's in contact with the soil. That's a termite attractor.

I see inadequate clearances. Could you get everywhere in this crawlspace or did you have to stop because there were places you couldn't fit?

I see all sorts of improvised framing and plywood spans that are too great.

I see undersized joists and joists that lack proper support.

I can't see, but I know it's there: inadequate footings, inadequate wiring and inadequate plumbing.

Frankly, it looks like a complete mess.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by Bryant16e

this photo was taken in the attic

Ok, well that make a lot more sense.

So. Starting from the beginning, the nails are *required* to come through the sheathing. Read the instructions on a bundle of roofing shingles.

Next, it looks like the rafters are awfully far apart. What was their OC distance?

Near the center of each picture, there are four pieces of wood. Two have their end grain facing the camera, and two have their long grain facing the camera. The end grain pieces are probably beams or girders. What do they rest on? I don't know what the long grain pieces are. Do you know what they were doing?

Are those 2x4 rafters? How far do they span? Are they sagging?

How much ventilation is there?

What caused the leak?

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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There is a hole in sheathing that caused the leak, 2x4 rafters used no sagging. Not sure of of 4 pieces of wood could not get any closer the zoom of the camera got me in that close. It was at soffit vents im 6-2" it was a really tight a human pretzel, thanks for your patience and feed back I recommended the owner contact a cert. contractor to evaluate.

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Yeah,

I'm looking at that photo and reading Randy's remarks and going, "Jeez, Randy, come on, that looks like cells with some blown-in FG in an attic. Then Jim did it too and I'm going, "What the hell," and wiping off my my glasses going, "No, that's definitely a top chord. Look at the press-plate gusset between the top and bottom chords."

You two had me going there for a minute.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Is there is a problem where the nail come through the sheathing?

Assuming we are looking at the underside of a roof deck covered by asphalt shingles, and that the sheathing is less than 3/4 inches thick (most plywood or OSB sheathing is), then the nails are required to penetrate through the sheathing (per IRC 905.2.5). For sheathing that is more than 3/4 inches thick, the fasteners must penetrate a minimum of 3/4 inch into the sheathing.

In the bottom photo, to the right of the truss top chord, it looks like the sheathing is growing a beard.

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Originally posted by Brandon Chew

In the bottom photo, to the right of the truss top chord, it looks like the sheathing is growing a beard.

Nah,

That's just where the guy manning the blower hose allowed the cells to hit the underside of the roof. It won't hurt anything. In fact, the borate in the cells will probably protect that portion of decking.

OT - OF!!!

M.

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