Jump to content

Crawl Gear


Bryan
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am looking for a recommendation on coveralls and knee pads. All of the coveralls I have tried are to short, i'm 6'3" and they don't fit or hold up. I would preferred the Tyvec type; however, may have to go with cotton. to gain a better fit. What is the preference on knee pads, type, brand?

Bryan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm 6'2 195-200lbs. I buy the run of the mill 2 or 3x long sleeved coveralls. I slip on a pair of cheap rain pants prior to the coveralls. When the coveralls get worn I toss them and buy some more.

I find knee pads a pain in the a$$. It's rare that I actually have enough room to get up on my knees anyway.

I always wear a respirator also.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

I have a pair of XXL insulated Carharts and a pair of the Craftsman one's that Walter just referenced. The carharts are for the winter, naturally, so obviously I'm using the others now. Get yourself a good nose/mouth respirator with P100 filters, make sure it fits properly, maintain it properly, and never go into a crawlspace or attic unless you're wearing it. Nitrile gloves work really well and a painter's hood is handy for those crawls that are just full of cobwebs and dregs of shredded insulation hanging down everywhere. I'm still trying to find a decent helmet that's not too big and bulky or loose that I can wear in tight places. Ideally, I'd like it to be kind of like a bathing cap - really tight fitting but at the same time able to prevent me from getting a hole in my head when I lift myself up into an attic hatch and bump my head against the ends of the roofing nails that are protruding through the sheathing or from cracking my skull when I smack it against a beam in a crawl. I've come to the conclusion that if I really want one like that, which fits my head closely, I'm going to have to make it.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I buy Tyvek by the case. Wear them 3-5 times and throw them away. 6'1" 240lbs. I buy the 3x to give me some room to move around in. I get the type with sewn in feet. That means that I they also come with a hood which I seldom use.

http://www.disposable-garments.com/tyvek_coveralls.html

Just got some fancy knee pads at the advise of Scott Patterson. Kinda pricey at $70. But he was right, they are the best thing going. I had some knee pads from Lowe's I probably spent $25-$35. I had knee pain during the crawl, when bending down, when walking up stairs, in bed sleeping. Figured I would spend the money and hope for the best. Within in one week, all knee pain went away. Definitely worth the money. PATELLA T brand.

http://www.patelladigs.com/patella_t/or ... wedge.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Coveralls:

Craftsman. 22 years at HI and I'm only on my second. My first was the herringbone, given to me by my father. He said they "shrunk" in the middle.

Knee pads:

I used to choose kneepads for comfort and traction. After a 12D entered behind my kneecap, I now have "tactical armor" knee pads. I just recently learned that I need Kevlar gloves too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by hausdok

I'm still trying to find a decent helmet that's not too big and bulky or loose that I can wear in tight places. Ideally, I'd like it to be kind of like a bathing cap - really tight fitting but at the same time able to prevent me from getting a hole in my head when I lift myself up into an attic hatch and bump my head against the ends of the roofing nails that are protruding through the sheathing or from cracking my skull when I smack it against a beam in a crawl. I've come to the conclusion that if I really want one like that, which fits my head closely, I'm going to have to make it.

Mike, I've got some relatively thin copper sheet left over from my kitchen remodel. It's flat right now, but it's a good malleable material and I'd be more than willing to hammer it into a close fit around your head.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.krawlgear.com/store/catalog/ ... 4ecb62211b

Mike,

scroll down for the cap

By the way, Tyvek with hood and shoes built in, elastic wrist.

3xl - I like the extra room. Toss after each use. (In the trash can where they got dirty) I don't want anything in my washing machine at home so disposable is my way. I seal the gloves and kneepads in a plastic bag and washem when I get home.

Full face respirator. I tape off both sides of the cartridge after each use and tossem when ever I see something I don't like the look of.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by inspecthistoric

Originally posted by Brandon Whitmore

Am I the only one that rips the crap out of my cloth coveralls? I have them patched up often (mostly on the back from subfloor nails), but go through several pairs a year. I guess I'll have to try out the Sear's one's

Are joists spaced really far apart in your area?

Where Brandon & I inspect, joists aren't commonly used on the first floor. We use a post & pier system. There's a perimeter stemwall and then 4x girders every four feet with 2x6 T&G car decking on top of the girders. Our crawlspaces are mazes of posts. Nail tips that protrude through the car decking rip our coveralls and the skin on our backs.

To answer Bryan's question, I really like Key coveralls. If you're tall, get the extra long version of whatever size you wear.

Personally, my knees don't bother me. Most of the crawlspaces here are too low for me to get up on my knees anyway. However my elbows suffer cruelly. I use hockey elbow pads.

I'd shred a Tyvek suit before I was halfway through one crawlspace.

Also, add my name to the list of people who like full-face respirators. I'll never go back to the half-face kind.

Mike, John Cranor makes his own bump caps out of a baseball hat lined with a piece of vinyl siding. Easy, cheap & disposable.

And finally, for those wondering about the crawlspace Krawler in the link that Charlie gave, I own one and I love it.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most of the crawlspaces here are too low for me to get up on my knees anyway. However my elbows suffer cruelly. I use hockey elbow pads.

Shoot, with the callous's (sp?) I have on my elbows I don't need elbow guards.

And finally, for those wondering about the crawlspace Krawler in the link that Charlie gave, I own one and I love it.

Since you own one, would you ever go without?

Do you use it on all of the low lying crawlspaces on flat ground, or just some of them?

Does it speed things up , slow things down, or just make it easier on your body?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

Well, that'll work if I cut the bill off it, I suppose. It will only get in my way.

Don't know how anyone could use a modified creeper in a crawl around here unless the thing were equipped with big knobby rock climbing tires, a motor to go up and down the hills, and could somehow magically transport you through the ducts that take up most of the space from floor to joists and have to be pushed up out of the way to squeeze by. You must have some heavenly flat crawlspaces down there, Jim.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Brandon Whitmore

Most of the crawlspaces here are too low for me to get up on my knees anyway. However my elbows suffer cruelly. I use hockey elbow pads.

Shoot, with the callous's (sp?) I have on my elbows I don't need elbow guards.

And finally, for those wondering about the crawlspace Krawler in the link that Charlie gave, I own one and I love it.

Since you own one, would you ever go without?

Do you use it on all of the low lying crawlspaces on flat ground, or just some of them?

Does it speed things up , slow things down, or just make it easier on your body?

Here's an article that I wrote for the ASHI Reporter that explains my experience:

It’s a sad fact that as we age, crawlspaces seem to become less glamorous than they were when we were young. At inspector gatherings, conversations often veer toward fanciful notions of easier ways to inspect crawlspaces. We explore all sorts of pipedreams. While we were dreaming, Craig Moorhead was doing. Over a period of 5 years, Moorhead invented and refined a device that he calls the Krawler.

The Krawler weighs 11 pounds. It’s 21 inches wide 15-1/2 inches long and 8 inches tall. Its 8-inch pneumatic tires rotate on sealed bearings and the stamped aluminum body is definitely robust. It sells for $329.

In January, Moorhead brought his Krawler to Inspection World 2007 to show and sell on the floor (literally) of the exhibition hall. Lots of inspectors had fun scooting around on the level, carpeted floor but many had doubts about how effective this gadget would be in the harsh world of a real crawlspace. That’s when Moorhead offered to loan one of his Krawlers to the ASHI tech committee to evaluate it for the Reporter. Since the committee members are spread all over the country, there are a wide range of conditions under which to test it and the tech committee certainly contains a broad range of characters who aren’t shy about providing honest feedback. I should point out that the arrangement contained no quid pro quo, Moorhead expected us to write an honest review.

As you can guess, the committee members’ reactions were mixed. I took to the Krawler right away, but Don Lovering in Massachusetts was unimpressed, “Tried it twice and put it back in the truck. I would not spend the money unless I knew I would always have smooth concrete floors to run on.â€

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Bryan

Also, add my name to the list of people who like full-face respirators. I'll never go back to the half-face kind.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Jim, What is your reason for the full face respirator?

Bryan

Mostly because it keeps stuff out of my eyes. I really like being able to lie on my back while poking around in the fiberglass insulation immediatly above my face. All the stuff that falls down just bounces off of the mask. Once I got used to the full-face respirator, the half-face one just seemed woefully inadequate.

Be warned that you have to find a model and a size that fit your face. People have differently shaped faces; not every model fits every person. I also had to shop around to find one that allowed me to have good vison to the top & sides. Some of them create a tunnel vision effect.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...