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Do you find repairs like this?


Phillip
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That is almost the exact detail used to wrap 4"-16" vent penetrations on a flat roof, only the rain diverter is metal and caulked in place. I think the neoprene would be more effective, but I've never seen it on a pitched roof.

Of course it's not going to do anything to help the rip at the base of the older neoprene flashing shown in your 1st pic.

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Older roof. The flashing around the plumbing vents have busted open. Some one comes and cuts the top out of new flashing and slides them down over the old flashing.

Heck, I've done that myself. Of course, I only did it as a temporary measure until the weather cleared up long enough to make a proper repair 10-12 years later.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Jim,

I have seen them like that and write them up every time.

Why? If the top of the boot is the only thing damaged, as in Jim's 1st photo, then a new partial (like the one you found) or full (like the one Jim put on) soil vent flashing will keep the top of the old flashing protected from the elements.

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I have an issue with Jim's type of repair as well[:-paperba

My concern is that debris will get caught between the new and old pipe jacks. The end result would be water damming up and leaking in at the torn boot. I know it's a far shot, but still. Plus, show me a credible source, besides Jim of course, showing either repair as acceptable.

I'd rather see a new boot pushed down and tarred onto the torn one.

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I have an issue with Jim's type of repair as well[:-paperba

My concern is that debris will get caught between the new and old pipe jacks. The end result would be water damming up and leaking in at the torn boot. I know it's a far shot, but still. Plus, show me a credible source, besides Jim of course, showing either repair as acceptable.

I'd rather see a new boot pushed down and tarred onto the torn one.

I hear ya Brandon and I guess it's possible that debris would accumulate between the boots, but I wouldn't call it out for that reason.

I can't show you a credible source that endorses either repair. The NRCA publishes a flat roof repair manual that quite frankly has some pretty wacky repair methods in it. Stuff like mod bit patches with roofing cement smeared along the perimeters. I don't believe they publish a steep sloped repair manual nor have I ever seen one from the shingle manufacturers so I just have to look at something like this and think like water, and I don't see a leak here.

I would avoid letting roof cement and neoprene come in contact with each other. The oils in the cement will breakdown the neoprene.

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