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trimming report text


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In the beginning, I use to include in every comment the following statement. "Have a qualified XXXX fix it."

Now, I say it once in each section such as roof, exterior and so on.

I think I'll trim it down to saying it once in the preface of the report. Nice and bold where it won't be missed so easily.

Maybe something like this:

"For all of the problems I list in this report, it's my recommendation for you to hire qualified licensed contractors to fix the things.

As you read the report, there will be numbered lists that identify problems and describe why they are problems."

Before I implement this, I want to make sure it will not conflict with ASHI SOP compliance.

Is this method suitable?

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For all of the problems I list in this report, it's my recommendation for you to hire qualified licensed contractors to fix the things.

Don't know about ASHI but what if you expanded that statement a little just to cover even the simple repairs that are likely to be corrected by the seller.

"Items noted in the observation sections of this report should be performed by a licensed/qualified contractor. Weather corrections are made by a licensed/qualified contractor or not, corrections should be made as noted by the manufacturer, current standards and/or codes."

Just a thought

Note: I do feel that if somebody is licensed, they should also be qualified. But I also don't think it hurts to included the extra word.

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For the fun, here is the entire preface page. Fire at will.

This inspection was performed and the report written in accordance with the "Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics" of the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) and The State of Maryland.

At the home inspection on the above listed property, you signed and were given an “Inspection Agreement / Contract for Servicesâ€

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I'm with Kurt except I'd prefer the word 'qualified' over 'appropriate'.

John, There are plenty of better writers than I on this forum but I went over the first part of your contract and I've some suggestions. Toss it if you wish. There's a 'Kevin O'Hornett' touch to it but I assure you.....it's only a touch.

This inspection and the resulting report have both been completed and are in compliance was performed and the report written in accordance with the "Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics" of the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) and that of the The State of Maryland.

Prior to the execution of At the home inspection on the above listed referenced property, you and the inspector mutually signed and were given an “Inspection Agreement / Contract for Servicesâ€

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This inspection was performed and the report written I inspected this house and wrote this report in accordance with the "Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics" of the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) and The State of Maryland. (ASHI's great & all that, but if you have a state standard, that's the one that's going to count. Go ahead and follow ASHI too, but don't complicate future litigation by dragging it in here -- Just my opinion.)

At the home inspection on the above listed property, you signed and were given an “Inspection Agreement / Contract for Servicesâ€

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. . . There's a 'Kevin O'Hornett' touch to it but I assure you.....it's only a touch. . . .

I've gotta say that I find Kevin's writing to be sleep inducing. Home inspection reports, by their nature, are pretty boring. Writing in the style of a lower tier bureaucrat only make it worse.

If we want our reports to be understandable, they shoudln't read like a government tax form.

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Forget all the "qualified/licensed/competent" contractor stuff. If they're a contractor, they're supposed to be licensed. In states where there's no license, it doesn't matter.

Who qualifies "qualified", or "competent"? The realtor? The seller? The buyer, who doesn't know anything?

Just tell folks there's problems that need to be repaired or reviewed for better understanding.

Tell folks in one, maybe two, sentences what's going on. Reports should be simple enough that explanations are not necessary. Think about that.

If the report is so dense it's got to have an explanation, something's wrong with the report. No amount of instruction is going to help if the thing is a mess.

These things are painful boring. Take pity on anyone reading your report. Make it simple, brief, and understandable with as few pictures, words, and pages as possible.

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