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mjr6550

What is it?

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I saw this today in a detached garage. Garage was probably built after 1907 and no later than 1920s. The water pipe coming up from the slab comes from the house. At the top left a pipe would have been connected with a union.

Edit: I realized that I posted one photo twice. I added a different photo. Still looking for an answer.

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Although the valves look like gas valves, I think it is water related. It appears that the center shaft rotates (there is a grease fitting at the left end).

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Hmm, it's a doozy all right! I can tell it's some kind of Mechanical Device.

Perhaps you should ask someone who calls themselves a Professional Mechanical & Structural Engineer!!

[:-monkeyd[:-monkeyd[:-monkeyd

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In the 1930s, there were systems available that used water pressure to open and close bi-swing garage doors. I suspect that the pictured device is part of that type of opener system.

I've never seen one, but read about them in publications from the period.

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In the 1930s, there were systems available that used water pressure to open and close bi-swing garage doors. I suspect that the pictured device is part of that type of opener system.

I've never seen one, but read about them in publications from the period.

Bill, Based upon how it looked this this thing would work, I think you are correct. I will try to research that.

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In the 1930s, there were systems available that used water pressure to open and close bi-swing garage doors. I suspect that the pictured device is part of that type of opener system.

I've never seen one, but read about them in publications from the period.

Bill, Based upon how it looked this this thing would work, I think you are correct. I will try to research that.

If you find any more information about it, please post it here.

The discs on that spindle resemble a fluid clutch system that I used to work with years ago.

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In the 1930s, there were systems available that used water pressure to open and close bi-swing garage doors. I suspect that the pictured device is part of that type of opener system.

I've never seen one, but read about them in publications from the period.

Bill, Based upon how it looked this this thing would work, I think you are correct. I will try to research that.

If you find any more information about it, please post it here.

The discs on that spindle resemble a fluid clutch system that I used to work with years ago.

I spend over an hour searching today and found nothing. I did not look back to see if I posted the photo below. It has a company name on it, but no luck with that either.

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Hmm, it's a doozy all right! I can tell it's some kind of Mechanical Device.

Perhaps you should ask someone who calls themselves a Professional Mechanical & Structural Engineer!!

[:-monkeyd[:-monkeyd[:-monkeyd

I'm asking here because that moron had no idea what it is.

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I did find one water-powered door opener, but that one is a bucket on a rope. [:)]

I suggest studying the US patent records for the 1920's and 30's, sort of a winter project.

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Looks like a knurled-knob at the far-right end with a spring under it... like you'd see on a kerosene container for an old in-kitchen kerosene stove.. maybe those discs are part of a multi-stage filter??

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Looks like a knurled-knob at the far-right end with a spring under it... like you'd see on a kerosene container for an old in-kitchen kerosene stove.. maybe those discs are part of a multi-stage filter??

Bill says it is a water-powered winch, a door opener. Are you suggesting he could be wrong? [:)]

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It is something which you cant encounter in your daily routine. It's probably built in 20's for water supply.

But the thing is what is use of it now.

If you really need to carry out with this, then it would be better if you replace it with new one.

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Auto-actuator for a hot water loop. Not sure what the purpose would be - perhaps to keep hot water in a line to avoid long waits.

When it cools down it allows a valve to cycle hot water into a loop. As that hot water moves into the loop, the bellows heat up and expand and force the valve shut again. When the bellows cool down again they contract and open the valve again to allow hot water to cycle into the loop, and so on.......

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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