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Opinions on dated appliance connections


inspectorwill
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Primarily that there are no means of disconnect at the appliances such as the dishwasher and disposal as required by current standards. I understand not much will comply with current standards when it comes to older homes but clients can become unhappy when they make upgrades and are surprised at additional costs that may be incurred.

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Primarily that there are no means of disconnect at the appliances such as the dishwasher and disposal as required by current standards. I understand not much will comply with current standards when it comes to older homes but clients can become unhappy when they make upgrades and are surprised at additional costs that may be incurred.

In most cases, a lockout at the breaker will suffice. And it's cheap.

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Primarily that there are no means of disconnect at the appliances such as the dishwasher and disposal as required by current standards. I understand not much will comply with current standards when it comes to older homes but clients can become unhappy when they make upgrades and are surprised at additional costs that may be incurred.

So educate them.

Something like, "You know, that disposal is really old. When you replace it, you'll have to either install a lockout in the panel so that it can't inadvertently be turned on when someone's working on it or you'll have to install a new cable and plug on it and rewire that BX there with a receptacle so that the disposal can be unplugged when necessary."

Ten seconds is all it takes.

I always tell 'em that home inspectors can't find every single thing wrong with a home and that there are sure to be some latent issues missed or unexpected expenses later. I point out that a house is a huge maintenance item waiting to ambush their pocket books and tell them if they're not ready to recognize that reality they might want to rethink homeownership.

Works for me.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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One item I watch for is the older wiring to the range. Usually there's a newer range sitting there. The wire gauge in pre 70's houses tends to be undersized, like #10, for a 40 amp breaker, and the BX grounding could be flaky. I don't pull the range out to see what's what, but I will comment on the antique feeder being possibly inadequate, and that they should upgrade the wiring.

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Along the same lines, older homes with original kitchens and gas appliances sometimes only have 15A available for the stove. It was just there to run the light and exhaust fan. New owners come along and may expect to remodel or just upgrade appliances, maybe with a 1000W microwave instead of the range hood, or a convection, partially electric range, and there is just not enough capacity there. They need to know there will be electrical work ($$$) first.

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