Jump to content

Mixing Refrigerant Types


Recommended Posts

What bad things will happen when you put a new evaporator coil (actually 4 years old now) manufactured for R-410a onto an old compressor (now 23 years) made for R-22?

Historically, it has caused Gahdafi to take a bullet in the forehead.

Wait, that wasn't bad thing.

Did it make Elvis die?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Do not mix the refrigerants.

The refrigerant oils are incompatable (won't mix) so insufficient compressor lubrication would result in a burned up compressor as well as poor performance.

410a operates at a higher pressure than R22 so it may be OK to continue using R22 only as your refrigerant (tongue in cheek -performance (cooling) may suffer - never tried it) as the other system components are rated for this refrigerant.

R22 is being phased out so your best bet is simply to replace the compressor/condenser unit and complete your upgrade to 410a.

Link to post
Share on other sites

More importantly, why are you rebuilding a cooling system when you're already several weeks into the heating season?

The really bad thing that will happen is that R22 won't be available for the next service interval. Your investing money in components that may not be serviceable in the very near future. It's kinda like putting a new transmission in a 1978 Chevette. It'll work, but it's not the best investment.

Link to post
Share on other sites

So,

A question from a fellow whose in an area where folks generally open a window when they need air conditioning; is there not a way to completely flush the old refrigerant, clean the system, dry it and charge it with a different type of lubricant?

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Link to post
Share on other sites

So,

A question from a fellow whose in an area where folks generally open a window when they need air conditioning; is there not a way to completely flush the old refrigerant, clean the system, dry it and charge it with a different type of lubricant?

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

410a operates at a higher pressure so assuming you could do all that, component life would still be questionable.

Because of this different temperature pressure relationship the efficiency of the system (cooling ability) would also be suspect.

Automobiles went through a virtually the same transition when they switched from R12 to 134A. While oils became available that were cross compatible, and discounting the fact that most of these systems leaked (why they were being retrofitted in the first place - R12 shot up to over $100.00 a pound), many retrofitted auto systems did not cool sufficiently afterward simply because the components were not designed for 134a.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mineral oil used with R-22 is not miscible with 410A. The thermodynamic qualities of the two refrigerants are very different. Compressor displacements suitable for either refrigerant it not in the least suitable for the other, so, although you could wash out the refrig lines, the compressor and coils would probably not yield you a decent functional system.

You can replace R-12 with propane, or butane, I forgot which, though 12 isn't used anymore.

I've once cleaned the refrig lines on my truck's AC as part of a conversion from R-12 to 134A. That worked great. Very meticulous cleaning is required.

Marc

Link to post
Share on other sites

You can replace R-12 with propane, or butane, I forgot which, though 12 isn't used anymore.

Marc

NEVER, NEVER, NEVER! replace refrigerant with a flammable, explosive gas.

A basic understanding of metering a gas through a restriction illustrates how dangerous this is. All of this takes place within the evaporator which is either in the house (A coil) or in the passenger compartment of the automobile (under the dash with the blower motor).

As I pointed out before most of the cars that needed retrofits leaked in the first place, and the most expensive and common leak was the evaporator. With a volatile gas in an automobile this is a recipe for disaster, you are now spraying flammable gases into the passenger compartment of an automobile. Light a cigarette or sparks from the blower motor and BOOM!

Link to post
Share on other sites

What bad things will happen when you put a new evaporator coil (actually 4 years old now) manufactured for R-410a onto an old compressor (now 23 years) made for R-22?

If you mean putting a new, never-been-charged evaporator coil into a working R-22 system, I think it would be just fine.

Of course, the 23 year old compressor could fail at any moment.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you mean putting a new, never-been-charged evaporator coil into a working R-22 system, I think it would be just fine.

You're saying the thermodynamic properties are sufficiently similar? It did seem to be cooling reasonably well.

Of course, the 23 year old compressor could fail at any moment.

Yep. The things some people will do to save a dime!

Turns out I didn't need to prepare a report. The mis-applied stucco (2 years ago, all wrong), roof problems and grading issues were more than the buyer was willing to swallow.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you mean putting a new, never-been-charged evaporator coil into a working R-22 system, I think it would be just fine.

You're saying the thermodynamic properties are sufficiently similar? It did seem to be cooling reasonably well.

It's just a long piece of tubing with some fins on it. As long as it's long enough (or longer), I don't see why it wouldn't perform adequately. It won't win any awards for efficiency, but it should work.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Most 410a coils can be used with R-22 ,R-22 coils cant be used with R410-A though.

Just because theyre no longer going to be manufacturing R-22 in the near future does not mean it wont be available,there is still lots of it sitting in warehouses/supply houses waiting to be sold.

Just make sure if/when you ever convert the rest of the system over to 410A that you replace the metering device at the coil and have everything flushed out properly

Link to post
Share on other sites

You can replace R-12 with propane, or butane, I forgot which, though 12 isn't used anymore.

Marc

NEVER, NEVER, NEVER! replace refrigerant with a flammable, explosive gas.

A basic understanding of metering a gas through a restriction illustrates how dangerous this is. All of this takes place within the evaporator which is either in the house (A coil) or in the passenger compartment of the automobile (under the dash with the blower motor).

As I pointed out before most of the cars that needed retrofits leaked in the first place, and the most expensive and common leak was the evaporator. With a volatile gas in an automobile this is a recipe for disaster, you are now spraying flammable gases into the passenger compartment of an automobile. Light a cigarette or sparks from the blower motor and BOOM!

Have you ever read the ingredients or msds sheet for 134A for anything flammable in there? [:-monkeyd
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...